Skip to navigation

Apple iPad mini review

Verdict

An outstanding compact tablet, beautifully designed and with great battery life. A little too expensive, though

Review Date: 9 Nov 2012

Reviewed By: Jonathan Bray

Price when reviewed: £224 (£269 inc VAT)

Buy it now for: £197
(see more store prices)

Overall Rating
5 stars out of 6

Features & Design
6 stars out of 6

Value for Money
4 stars out of 6

Performance
5 stars out of 6

PCPRO Recommended

For the past few years Apple has set the pace in the tablet market, but with Amazon’s Kindle Fire range and Google’s Nexus 7 gaining a significant foothold in the compact market, it's started to fall behind. Now Apple has hit back with its own compact slate: the 7.9in iPad mini.

It might have taken its time, but Apple has tackled the problem with gusto: the iPad mini is the most physically accomplished tablet on the market. At a mere 7.2mm it's considerably slimmer than the Fire HD and Nexus 7, and its weight of 308g makes it lighter as well.

Apple iPad mini

The iPad mini is a lovely thing to hold in the hand, with a flat, matte aluminium panel at the rear and slightly rounded corners and edges. As with other iPads, any ports, switches and buttons are kept to a minimum: the single home key sits below the screen; there’s a volume and silence switch along the top right-hand edge; the power switch is just around the corner from that; and the Lighting connector sits on the bottom edge.

Display mate?

It isn't only the physical design of the iPad mini that's appealing, though. At 7.9in the screen is nearly an inch larger than its rivals and, critically, this doesn’t have too much of an impact on the overall size of the tablet. Unusually narrow bezels to the left and right of the screen ensure it isn’t too wide; at 135mm, it’s 1.5cm broader than the Nexus 7. Those with small hands will struggle to grip the tablet around both edges.

The quality of the IPS panel is up to Apple's usual standards. A maximum brightness of 389cd/m2 sets it in front of the Nexus 7, and a contrast of 720:1 ensures images and video look vibrant and leap off the screen.

Apple iPad mini vs Nexus 7

If you were expecting a Retina display similar to the one on the full-sized iPad, however, you’ll be disappointed. When the mini's 1,024 x 768 resolution is stretched over the 4:3 ratio display, it gives a pixel density of only 163ppi - almost half that of the 3rd/4th-generation iPad with its glorious Retina display. It’s also a noticeable distance behind the displays of the Nexus 7 and Kindle Fire HD, both of which offer 1,280 x 800 and a pixel density of 216ppi.

In use, the lower resolution is clearly noticeable, and icons, text and graphics have a visibly grainy quality that isn’t apparent on its cheaper rivals. It looks precisely as you’d expect a shrunken iPad 2 to look. We’re surprised Apple didn’t see fit to endow the iPad mini with a Retina display, especially given the premium price tag, but in day-to-day use the lack of pixels isn’t that big a deal.

Apple iPad mini

What also isn’t that big a deal is the smaller screen size. It’s true that the buttons and general UI furniture don’t resize on the mini, and so are smaller and slightly fiddlier to press. The narrow screen bezel means that if you hold the screen a certain way, your thumb can creep onto the touchscreen surface and inadvertently turn pages in the Kindle app, for instance.

These are by no means big problems, however, and using the keyboard is a surprisingly pleasant experience. Although you won’t be touch-typing on it, it’s easy to get up a reasonable head of speed, and it’s perfectly good for tapping out emails and social network updates.

1 2

Best Prices

Price comparison powered by Reevoo

£197
£199
£199
£202
£259
£262
£262
£299
£400
Subscribe to PC Pro magazine. We'll give you 3 issues for £1 plus a free gift - click here
User comments

The moment you buy this...

...Know that the Retina (pointless Buzz-word) will follow and shortly after a new iOS update will reduce your lovely iPad mini to a crawl. The cycle continues.

By rhythm on 12 Nov 2012

Display

You're a bit down on the display but to put it in context at 163ppi it must be better than than the iPad 2 at 132ppi. On my ipad 2 icons are not visibly grainy and I still think it's a beautiful display - as you did even when the iPad 3 came out. It's only when you do a side by side comparison that you realise the ipad 3/4 is better.

By jmiii on 12 Nov 2012

Too expensive

Just compared prices at Amazon's US and UK sites. The US price is £58 cheaper than here.

No surprise.

Must be something to do with shipping costs or taxes etc.

Or it may be they know they can get away with it.

By Michael on 12 Nov 2012

Price verdict

"We don’t think Apple has quite got the price right"

Jonathan, you overlook one important point regarding the price: that demand for the iPad Mini outstrips supply, so they can price it however they like. When people buy a product, the price is fairly irrelevant.

You can't state you think the price is too high, when the product is on-sale and selling well. Prices are dictated by demand and if the demand is there, you can artificially raise the price. If demand drops, you can reduce it. I'm surprised Apple didn't come in at £299 consider the demand for the iPad Mini.

By moxxey on 12 Nov 2012

I don't get it...

"In day-to-day use the lack of pixels isn’t that big a deal.". Read: "the over-hyped Retina screens aren't that big a deal"?

"[The processor] held up rather well". So the newer processors are also overkill?

I wonder too if the lack of bezel may become a curse - constantly having Kindle pages turned when you don't want them to sounds more than a slight pain, to me.

Apple may have started something dangerous (for themselves) here: the "I need better, faster, more pixels" etc. has been what's driven their recent models. Now they've as good as admitted that's flawed.

Slightly puzzled this makes the A list. Sure, the App Store is (becoming arguably) the best store for tablet apps. Sure, £110 more is one way to put it. Nearly twice the price is another. (70% more expensive, to be accurate). Pitting a £400 laptop against a £700 laptop would be a bit daft. (By the way, it's a 16GB Nexus you can now get for 169, not 8GB as in the review). Sure, we can now discuss the point of the A list - this *may* be the *best* smaller tablet. But I think that misses the point. As the review admits, most people buy this size not just for size, but for price. And the Nexus 7 or Kindle Fire HD are *clearly* better value-for-money tablets. Please don't let money-no-object dominate all A list classes which aren't clearly labelled "budget".

By JimmyN on 12 Nov 2012

You can state that the price is to high. Whilst you are right prices are largely dicatated by demand. It does not make it right. If the competition can serve up similar/better for approaching half the price. They are taking the mick, but thats nothing new.

By davidk1962 on 12 Nov 2012

The reduced size/weight over the full size iPad would certainly be a positive factor for me.

The standard iPad is a bit too big and heavy for me to want to lug about on the move.

I'm sure other people are quite happy with using it on the move but I want something more pocketable.

OK, I could put the normal iPad in my Scottevest iPad pocket but have you tried walking about like that?

By Alfresco on 12 Nov 2012

@moxxey, @davidk1962

You are both off the mark! The reviewer is saying that, in his view, this product is not good value for money. He is not saying Apples marketeers are incompetent: they are entitled to charge what the market will bear. Also, this is not a moral issue: no one is forcing people to purchase from Apple.

What *is* a moral/regulatory issue is when Apple tries to abuse intellectual property law to build a monopoly. The quid-pro-quo for being a premium brand with high margins is that you must allow others to freely compete on price.

By JohnAHind on 12 Nov 2012

Not premium enough

I'd happily pay a premium for the premium builds apple are renowned for, however a comparatively grainy display just doesn't cut it for me. Once you've been using high dpi devices for a while, you'll never want to go back!

Not sure what i'd have done though in Apple's position - the resolution they chose was presumably to aid app developers being exactly half that of the retina displays. They could have improved the dpi by making the screen smaller but might have then found it even harder to justify the price over that of their iPod Touch.

I personally think Apple should have put the usability onus on app developers (ie forcing them to say double the size of all their graphics) rather than try and handle this themselves via a comparatively low res screen.

By luke20 on 12 Nov 2012

Apple Can Do No Wrong?

Oh great. Another forgiving, fawning review of a sub-standard Apple product. Give us a break. Why don't you just come clean and admit the competition have got it right and Apple has lost its shine? From grainy images to purple pictures to maps that aren't right they just seem to have lost their way (no pun intended). For £269 they could have produced specs that knocked the rest out of the park but then again - the profits wouldn't be so great would they? Not with all those legal bills to pay for everyone they sue.

By barrada on 12 Nov 2012

Nexus 7 with mobile data still cheaper!

I see you can now buy a 32GB Nexus 7 with unlocked mobile data for £239. That's still £30 less than the iPad Mini without mobile data.
An AppleiPad Mini with 32GB and mobile data is an amazing £210 dearer than the Nexus 7.

By steven_h1 on 12 Nov 2012

Apple has peaked

ant this is the best evidence yet

By Mat1971 on 12 Nov 2012

Increase in size over Nexus7 is (negatively) important

Having a 7.9 inch screen makes this an alternative for a normal sized iPad.

I wanted a much smaller device to have *alongside* my iPad - i.e. having discovered that I wanted my iPad with me that meant a backpack *and* that hanging about outside McDonalds after pulling it out of the backpack and trying to get a signal was just asking for trouble.

The Nexus7 is small enough to make a good alternative as it fits in my coat pocket - i.e. it can be sensibly be bought as a second device. It's tight though so would the iPad mini fit there?

Of course with an iPad mini I wouldn't need to look for apps but how boring would that be. (Says he wondering why Android didn't include a podcast app).

By MikeW2 on 12 Nov 2012

---Mini comment alert ----

yawn.....

By TigerUnleashed on 12 Nov 2012

retina ipad mini (2)

There has already been a leak that the retina iPad mini is due out next year (not entirely surprised though).

Size may have a greater bearing on it I find the size of my Nexus7 very handy and slim enough to slip into my back pocket if needed. a iPad mini could not due to the extra width. As such I feel they have made it too big thus again needing it to be carried around in its own little pouch rather than something that could be slipped into a coat/trouser pocket.

Personally, I find the size of the Nexus7 just right to hold and wouldnt want the bezels any slimmer. I have seen other reviews also comment that the tech to prevent your palm on the screen from creating a "touch" didnt work that well.

As someone points out the price of the Nexus has just shifted as the 16GB is now £159 and 32GB £199. Additionally, I believe that Comet are selling them off at 10% reduction due to their predicament. or Currys have them at £20 off when you also buy a case.

So given that this review is already out of date will it be updated to show the iPad mini as being less value for money?

By Sarcen on 12 Nov 2012

retina ipad mini (2)

There has already been a leak that the retina iPad mini is due out next year (not entirely surprised though).

Size may have a greater bearing on it I find the size of my Nexus7 very handy and slim enough to slip into my back pocket if needed. a iPad mini could not due to the extra width. As such I feel they have made it too big thus again needing it to be carried around in its own little pouch rather than something that could be slipped into a coat/trouser pocket.

Personally, I find the size of the Nexus7 just right to hold and wouldnt want the bezels any slimmer. I have seen other reviews also comment that the tech to prevent your palm on the screen from creating a "touch" didnt work that well.

As someone points out the price of the Nexus has just shifted as the 16GB is now £159 and 32GB £199. Additionally, I believe that Comet are selling them off at 10% reduction due to their predicament. or Currys have them at £20 off when you also buy a case.

So given that this review is already out of date will it be updated to show the iPad mini as being less value for money?

By Sarcen on 12 Nov 2012

A-List... really?

Bested in every single department by my aging Galaxy Tab 7.7.

Considering the Tab 7.7 is now available for around the same price (~£380 for 16gb 3G model) it's a no brainer. You get a higher resolution AMOLED plus screen (ie: non-pentile), dual core 1.5ghz processor, expandable storage, solid metal body (for those that care), ICS, and a bigger than 7" screen (yes, the extra screen width is useful, which is why most of us know the iPhone5’s much vaunted screen expansion is actually next to useless. Nobody seemed to mention that ~7.9” was the magic, ideal screen size when it was reviewed though!)

By TheHonestTruth on 12 Nov 2012

I guesed the "result" before I read the article

Am I psychic???

By wittgenfrog on 12 Nov 2012

I don't get it

If I'd read the review until the last paragraph I'd never have guessed it would be an A list product.

Looking at the pros in that final paragraph... beautiful design, light weight, broad screen, great cameras and fantastic battery life. Ok, it's lighter than the Nexus 7. But not by a great deal. Battery life appears to be comparable on paper. Who the hell needs a rear facing camera on a tablet? So, it comes down to a nice design and being slightly lighter. Wow. I can see why you'd want that over a higher definition screen and much lower price.

David.

By artiss on 12 Nov 2012

A list?

I struggle to see how a device that is acknowledged to be expensive, and has lower pixel density and less memory than the competition can be at the top of the A list.

As for the "value" comments earlier - value is not the same as "what the market will bear". Value is relative to other devices on the market and the iPad Mini therefore does not represent good value. It's a fact that, for now at least, many Apple customers will pay extra for their devices whether or not they represent good value. What's changed is that in the past they could say they had paid for a premium product - with the single exception of build quality this is questionable in the case of the Mini.

The mini will sell well, of course it will, it's a nice tablet. But I don't believe it will dominate in the way the original iPad did- purely because of the competition from Google and, especially, Amazon (and if you want to see a real sell-out product, try buying a Kindle Paperwhite)

The lack of retina is the biggest puzzle for me - with it they could have justified the premium (maybe), without it, it looks a bit half-hearted, maybe just a little cynical?

By KevPartner on 12 Nov 2012

Comparison table

The comparison table needs updating. The £199 Nexus model includes 32GB, not 16.

Interesting that the Nexus 7 has more stars than the iPad mini...

By KevPartner on 12 Nov 2012

As is always the case with apple less is more. . . . more money! This is not an A list tablet, it's screen is worse, it has no expansion & it costs more. How can this be better?

By GlidemanUK on 12 Nov 2012

Why am I not surprised?

Typical PC Pro review of an apple product. It's inferior to the Nexus 7 in almost every department yet more expensive - but it's on the A-List? Don't know why I bother coming back here I really don't.

And on the subject of pixel density - when reviewing other tablets against the iPad, lower PPI is a negative point. iPad Mini vs Nexus 7 - nah it doesn't matter. Utter rubbish.

By everton2004 on 12 Nov 2012

The Nexus 7 is amazing...

..for the cash.I feel we kinda lose touch about how lucky we are. I've just got a 32g version for my assistant to store her portfolio and for use in the studio and for £200 we are blown away. I'm going to run it alongside my iPad 3 and see how it performs. For photography the screen on the 7 is superb.

By Viktor on 12 Nov 2012

It's probably best not to get carried away with spec. sheets, but to compare the actual hardware in use.
When you compare the iPad Mini screen to an iPad 3 or 4 "retina" display, it is clearly not as sharp, but it is only slightly less vibrant and at normal viewing distances it isn't a huge difference at all.

However comparing it with the Nexus 7 actually shows the Mini screen to be much brighter and vibrant, compared with the Nexus 7's rather muted and slightly washed out pictures. Colours on the Mini look deeper and more more natural too. We have seen them side by side to be able to say this.
The biggest difference is in the actual viewing area that that extra inch of screen provides in practise (more than a third extra). There is a marked advantage for the Mini here.
For web browsing, reading magazines and documents and for viewing photos, the Mini is by far the best of the bunch in the "compact" tablet market. The Nexus in comparison, is a series of compromises.

As for price, yes the Mini is far too expensive in my opinion. Not only for the cheapest WiFi only 16GB model, but when you move up to 32 & 64GB and cellular 4G models, then it becomes ridiculously expensive for a compact tablet.

Apple has said they did not set out to make a cheap tablet, but to make a smaller, more portable version of the iPad and despite the non-retina screen, they've successfully achieved this. It's very well made, feels like a quality product and despite reservations about the screen resolution, actually has a very bright and vibrant display that betters the current alternatives in actual usage. That's why most hands-on reviews are rating it highly and rightly so.
Whether it's worth paying the extra for the Mini over other compact tablets will be down to individual choice.

By GoneWithTheWind on 12 Nov 2012

I want one...

... I want that one! Whatever people say they will sell, cos they're just so darn CUUUTE! :^D

Actually just as a point of interest... Why do the Android lot always find it necessary to take pot-shots at the Apple lot, yet you very rarely see the opposite? It's almost like they feel they have something to prove? I've got Apple products, but really don't feel it necessary to trumpet their products, or slag-off Android products as they make some great pieces of hardware too.

Not saying anything, just making an observation...

By mrmmm on 12 Nov 2012

A list??

This should not be on the a list

By Ryenose on 12 Nov 2012

@mrmmm

If you think apple types don't take pot shots at android types, you need to pay a bit more attention! Just making an observation as a very content wp7 user...

By sihaz2 on 12 Nov 2012

@sihaz2

You beat me to it.

By nickallison on 13 Nov 2012

Playing

I played with the new iPad, the mini, a few Androids and a couple of Windows 8 tablets at the weekend.

For me, the iPads felt old fashioned. Android felt much better, but to my surprise, I was really wowed by the Windows 8 tablets (Acer and Samsung).

I still don't know why I would want a tablet, but I want a Windows 8 tablet... :-D

By big_D on 13 Nov 2012

@GoneWithTheWind

"at normal viewing distances it [retina] isn't a huge difference at all"

Funny that's what every rational person has been saying about "stunning" (tm) Retina screens all along, as compared with our bog standard 1920x1200 monitors at working distances.

And I agree about the extra inch in screen size - it's made all the difference on the Tab 7.7 ever since its release a year ago. Combined with the better viewing angles and more vibrant and accurate colours (user selectable!) of the AMOLED Plus screen, and MicroSD slot for heavy media consumption, identical battery life and metal body, everything else feels like a compromise!

Hey, how about an extra inch over the 7.9"? Surely an 8.9" tablet would give you an even better experience and be even more of a "marked advantage"?

:D

By TheHonestTruth on 13 Nov 2012

Compare like with like

can't compare a 8 inch tablet to a 7 inch one. May as well compare it to a 10 inch one.

Cant compare budget tablet to a premium one.

so this shouldn't be in the same classification as the Amazon Fire or the Asus Nexus 7.

By some classification the Apple is a "nicer" device, but offers nowehere near the value the other devices do and the screen is a massive disappointment. Apple device in comparison offers actually quite poor value - with the innards of at least a year old device whereeas the Amazon and Asus offering are bang up to date.

I'd feel robbed if I was to buy the ipad mini.

By Manuel on 13 Nov 2012

My Opnion

Something no one else has mentioned is that the mini doesn't come with GPS which I think is a terrible let down and given that these compact tablets make perfect SatNav devices and walking route mapping it seems a big hole in the product given the premium price.

I've got a Nexus 7 and its great day to day I don;t have any complaints it fits snug in my pockets without needing a bag which I presume won't be the case with the mini. Google have just released it's 2nd upgrade since the Nexus 7 came out with new feature and bug fixes, I don;t know what Apple are like with there software upgrades but I like to continual dev of Android and the fact that Nexus devices always get the upgrade and will until the hardware can't handle it anymore.

By Jonchill on 14 Nov 2012

Great Tablet, but far too expensive.

As I said in a previous post above, I think the iPad Mini is priced too high. The extra over the Nexus 7 is only to be expected as the Google device is sold at cost price and the Mini a more expensive product, but £110 more for the basic model is far too big a price difference. Something like £50 to £60 more may be justifiable, but not £110.
When it comes to the 32GB and the 3/4G cellular models, then the Mini is way too expensive, even for a better quality product.

Oh and Manuel, the "innards" are almost all brand new. Only the CPU chip is from the iPad 2. You'll find that there are more up-to-date-components in there than the Nexus.

By GoneWithTheWind on 14 Nov 2012

innards

I was counting screen resolution as well which seems to also be a backward step. I accept the components may be new (are new), however apple seem to have gone very "lite" with the components for the cheaper "premium" product.

By fionapro on 14 Nov 2012

The innards are fine.

Quote "...apple seem to have gone very "lite" with the components for the cheaper "premium" product."

Well lets try to be fair and objective....
Aluminium alloy body
longer lasting battery than competing compact tablets
4G LTE in the cellular models (unlike certain others with only 3G)
A new Dual-band WiFi module
5MP back facing camera (others have non)
Even the lower resolution screen is the first of a new generation of thinner displays, to be seen on a tablet device.....and it's a larger screen than most competitors too.
The processor is also a match and just as fast in practise as the quad-core in the Nexus 7, as demonstrated in virtually every review test published so far.

So where is the "lite"?
OK it's a lot lighter :)
..and they've left out NFC and also left out GPS in the non-cellular models. Anything else?

By GoneWithTheWind on 14 Nov 2012

Another iSnobs cash generator

iSnobs continually flock to buy apple products to line apples pockets with cash without paying UK taxes in-spite of the obscene amounts of money made here in the UK. Bearing in mind existing apple technology, this product is already out of date and no doubt will be superseded soon.
I think apple could soon fall off their perch.
I hope the UK government get their act together to stop this gross tax avoidance. The UK is entitled to benefit from the cash generated from the iSnobs

By Nigel_Hawes on 15 Nov 2012

Buy an Android tablet...

And wonder why people buy tablets.

Comparing specs and prices is meaningless. The iPad mini is streets ahead and deserves its A list status.

By confucious on 15 Nov 2012

Google don't pay their Taxes either.

@Nigel_Hawes
Do Keep up.
Google and Amazon have just been heavily slated for their non-payment of UK taxes.

Whatever you think about it, tax avoidance is a common feature affecting a large number of multi-national companies operating in the UK and elsewhere.

By GoneWithTheWind on 15 Nov 2012

Outstanding...??? Sad style victims only

Buy a better,cheaper device. And if you must, spend a bit of your considerable saving on a 'nice' designer cover. By the way, a higher res. screen is pretty much essential for a modern UI whatever the device. Another pointless pro-apple review. Maybe they give them away to reviewers. Lower specifcation than its rivals, hideous price, and locked into Apple's OS and pricing structure.

By geeb1961 on 15 Nov 2012

What happened to the Galaxy Note 7.1?

What happened to the Galaxy Note 7.1 in your review Jonathan? No mention at all! (Have you)fallen victim to Apple's "prohibition" forces??

By drspek on 15 Nov 2012

The innards are fine.

If people want to spend over the odds on a nice looking tablet packed with okay innards, that's their prerogative. They'll have listened to Apple's world-leading marketing and honestly believe that it's cutting edge/magic technology, and scoff at the choice in the Android and W8 markets, but that’s the kind of people that Apple has identified it can make most money from. As IT professionals who are generally better informed about these things, we shouldn't belittle the people who want to pay extra for a fancy label or the genuine benefits that an old, simple and restricted OS brings.


@GoneWithTheWind
Quote:
“Aluminium alloy body
Longer lasting battery than competing compact tablets
5MP back facing camera (others have non)
Even the lower resolution screen is the first of a new generation of thinner displays, to be seen on a tablet device.....and it's a larger screen than most competitors too.
The processor is also a match and just as fast in practise as the quad-core in the Nexus 7, as demonstrated in virtually every review test published so far.”

The Tab 7.7 has all of the above, plus a thinner body, a higher resolution, more vivid and more accurate screen (if the user selects it!), expandable storage and GPS, for the same price. The only thing it lacks is 4G and the dual band Wifi that the Kindle Fire HD pioneered in tablets, but that’s because the Tab 7.7’s two generations old now (in terms of iGenerations, that is).


@drspek
Haven't you heard? 7.1" is now simply far too teeny-weeny. How did anyone ever produce anything smaller than 7.9” and believe it would work?!

By TheHonestTruth on 15 Nov 2012

The Samsung Tab is being given away for free.

The Samsung 7" tablets have failed to sell in anything but small numbers. They are being cleared out of stockrooms and warehouses by being bundled in as a free gift with certain mobile phone deals and included free with certain Samsung digital cameras.

By GoneWithTheWind on 15 Nov 2012

Podcast & A-list

I know it belongs in "pedantic's corner", but in the podcast, you (unwittingly) gave the impression that the ipad mini comes with the smart cover, it's a £35 extra.

Like a lot of the previous comments, I find making it the A-list choice is hard to justify - if for no other reason that it gets less stars than the Nexus - again "pedantics corner"

I know you get fed up with being accussed of being Apple fan boys (wrongly in my opinion), but having four Apple products in as many categories as A-list winners doesn't do you many favours.

Obviously, Apple kit is very good, but does their poor value for money mark them out as deserving the best buy tag?

If I was advising my clients on buying a mini tablet, I'd find it hard to recommend paying the extra £110.

By bronven on 15 Nov 2012

Thanks for the Samsung info!

GoneWithTheWind's post prompted me to take a look for any offers on tablets at the moment and I found an absolute cracker! £259 (after £50 cashback) for a Note 10.1 from the giant online retailer named after a South American river. I was only going to look, but that deal was far too tempting. Charging it up as I write!
;)

By TheHonestTruth on 19 Nov 2012

Environmentally unsound

I believe one also ought to note that like so many Apple products, the iPad Mini's use of glued and non-user-serviceable components (batteries included) makes it quite difficult to recycle. It may be rewarding to use, but it's also all too likely to end up as toxic waste.

By Patrick_R on 19 Nov 2012

Environmentally unsound

I believe one also ought to note that like so many Apple products, the iPad Mini's use of glued and non-user-serviceable components (batteries included) makes it quite difficult to recycle. It may be rewarding to use, but it's also all too likely to end up as toxic waste.

By Patrick_R on 19 Nov 2012

A-List???

I really just want to add to the list of people who are astounded this made it to the A-List despite being inferior to the Nexus 7 in almost every dept. I was genuinely disappointed with PCPRO on this decision. If it is iOS that you are saying is perfect then fine , say that in the review for iOS but this is just a poor suite with a expensive price tag.

By JustUmmar on 29 Nov 2012

@JustUmmar

quote "....astounded this made it to the A-List despite being inferior to the Nexus 7 in almost every dept."

Well the point is it isn't inferior to the Nexus 7 in several departments, as noted in many professional reviews and demonstrated quite amply in some video reviews.

The Nexus scores higher on its more "pocketable" size and shape (for those that it matters to), being easier to hold in one hand (being "grippier" with its rubberised plastic back) and its much lower price.

The higher screen resolution of the Nexus is largely negated by the poor contrast and muted colour rendition and the quad core processor doesn't give it any advantage in terms of actual practical speed.

Where the iPad Mini scores higher is on the speed and consistency of frame rendering, where the performance difference is quite noticeable. The Nexus suffers from a higher rate of dropped frames and a less than perfectly smooth touch operation, being comparatively jerky and laggy.

The OS is a matter of personal choice.

By GoneWithTheWind on 2 Dec 2012

Leave a comment

You need to Login or Register to comment.

(optional)

Latest Tablets Reviews
Apple iPad Air 2 review

Apple iPad Air 2

Category: Tablets
Rating: 5 out of 6
Price: £399
Fujitsu Stylistic Q704 review

Fujitsu Stylistic Q704

Category: Tablets
Rating: 4 out of 6
Price: £1,771
Hands on: Lenovo Yoga Tablet 2 Pro review

Hands on: Lenovo Yoga Tablet 2 Pro

Rating: 4 out of 6
Price: £1,771
Hands on: Lenovo Yoga Tablet 2 review

Hands on: Lenovo Yoga Tablet 2

Rating: 4 out of 6
Price: £1,771
Tesco Hudl 2 review

Tesco Hudl 2

Category: Tablets
Rating: 5 out of 6
Price: £129
Compare reviews: Laptops

advertisement

Most Commented Reviews
Latest News Stories Subscribe to our RSS Feeds
Latest Blog Posts Subscribe to our RSS Feeds
Latest Features
Latest Real World Computing

advertisement

Sponsored Links
 

 
SEARCH
Loading
WEB ID
SIGN UP

Your email:

Your password:

remember me

advertisement


Hitwise Top 10 Website 2010
 
 

PCPro-Computing in the Real World Printed from www.pcpro.co.uk

Register to receive our regular email newsletter at http://www.pcpro.co.uk/registration.

The newsletter contains links to our latest PC news, product reviews, features and how-to guides, plus special offers and competitions.