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Acer DX241H review

Verdict

A neat idea poorly implemented: you can buy a cheap PC and a better quality screen for a similar price

Review Date: 2 Jun 2011

Reviewed By: Mike Jennings

Price when reviewed: £249 (£299 inc VAT)

Overall Rating
3 stars out of 6

Features & Design
3 stars out of 6

Value for Money
3 stars out of 6

Image Quality
3 stars out of 6

We’ve seen Linux-based software used before to provide a quick way to boot into a basic, internet-enabled OS, but usually it’s been in a motherboard or laptop. Acer’s DX241H extends the idea to the world of monitors.

From the outside it looks like any standard 24in monitor, and it has the usual 1080p resolution. The difference is that at the rear, alongside the standard HDMI and D-SUB outputs, are four USB 2 ports and a Gigabit Ethernet port. Hook these up to your keyboard and mouse, an external hard disk or USB thumb drive and your network connection, and you have a standalone internet-cum-media playback terminal. No need for a PC at all, in fact.

Acer DX241H

Switch on the DX241H and in around ten seconds you’re thrown into Acer’s proprietary UI. This is dominated by six buttons: one launches a simplified version of Google Chrome (complete with Adobe Flash compatibility), while the rest provide links to popular social networks and search engines, with YouTube, Twitter and Facebook alongside Bing and Yahoo.

A group of buttons in the bottom-right of the screen hide the Acer’s true selling point, though: the CyberLink-developed clear.fi software. This picks up any DLNA-compliant client on your network, as well as files on drives connected to the USB sockets at the rear, for music, movie and photo playback.

In practice this is a good idea, but it’s ruined by poor performance and design. The chip used inside the DX241H clearly isn’t up to task: HD clips on YouTube and BBC iPlayer were unwatchable thanks to constant juddering; only SD clips played smoothly. Video file playback was better: we managed to get some of our test 720p clips to run smoothly, but we found file compatibility patchy, with many files failing to play and some causing the DX241H to crash.

Acer DX241H

The UI doesn’t help. It’s slow and unresponsive, with options taking a couple of seconds to initialise once selected, and graphical glitches mar the slick-looking software. You can’t build playlists, the device navigation interface doesn’t support mouse scroll-wheels, and the lack of tool-tips makes already-unfamiliar icons even more difficult to understand.

Issues abound elsewhere. There’s no indication of network connectivity once you’ve left the setup wizard. Photo slideshows are plagued by sluggish image transitions and playback controls that are unresponsive in the extreme. The browser is better, gaining a SunSpider score of 4,119ms, but that's not much compensation.

Image quality, meanwhile, is a mixed bag, with colour accuracy not far behind the A-Listed ViewSonic VP2365wb, but a low contrast ratio of 238:1 gives a slightly washed out, tepid look. The built-in speakers are nothing special either.

The Acer’s main attraction is undoubtedly its software front-end but, when the software is this poor and the price this high, we can’t possibly recommend it, either as a standalone device or a PC monitor.

Author: Mike Jennings

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User comments

Not fit for purchase

Reading your review, it's incredulous that Acer has the audacity to release such a shockingly poor and not fit for purchase piece of hardw... junk.

This should be classed as criminal activity, selling something that clearly does not work!

By treadmill on 2 Jun 2011

Hmmm, why did I type purchase? Should have been purpose.

By treadmill on 2 Jun 2011

Suits Some

No doubt the price will drop to a more reasonable street price at a level people will be willing to pay for a simple internet device. Not everyone will want to use it for watching HD content. I presume for normal internet use there should be no issues and therefore a reasonable buy at the correct price. A price similar to a good netbook with a much more confortable to view screen.

By Manuel on 2 Jun 2011

Looks like a good idea

I think that this idea will catch on. 9 times out of 10, I am happy to have just Internet access and media playback. Perhaps the next iteration will be the one to buy.
Or perhaps it won't catch on until Apple popularise it, like they did with tablet computers.

By ramjam on 2 Jun 2011

Looks like a good idea

I think that this idea will catch on. 9 times out of 10, I am happy to have just Internet access and media playback. Perhaps the next iteration will be the one to buy.
Or perhaps it won't catch on until Apple popularise it, like they did with tablet computers.

By ramjam on 2 Jun 2011

Acer don't do software!

This is typical of Acer, to produce a product that's incomplete. Although they build affordable reasonable quality hardware they seem to see software as a necessary evil. Most of the Acer cr*pware is just that and they don't provide any upgrades to software or drivers over the life of a product.

By milliganp on 3 Jun 2011

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