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Apple MacBook Pro with Retina display (2012) review

Verdict

The MacBook Pro gains a staggeringly crisp Retina display and quad-core Ivy Bridge CPU. The result is stunning, and expensive

Review Date: 19 Jun 2012

Reviewed By: Sasha Muller

Price when reviewed: £1,499 (£1,799 inc VAT)

Overall Rating
6 stars out of 6

Features & Design
6 stars out of 6

Value for Money
5 stars out of 6

Performance
6 stars out of 6

PCPRO Recommended

While PC manufacturers have been busily updating their ranges with Intel’s Ivy Bridge processors, Apple has gone a step further. Not content with updating the internals, it has transplanted the same Retina display concept from the iPad to its flagship MacBook Pro.

Just as the iPad’s Retina display left every other tablet trailing in its wake, the MacBook Pro now promises to do the same to every other laptop on the planet. Squeezing a massive 2,880 x 1,800 resolution into a 15.4in IPS panel, it’s a technological marvel.

Pixel perfection

Those 5.1 million pixels aren’t quite as tightly packed as on the new iPad or the iPhone 4S, but that hardly matters. The MacBook Pro’s 220ppi density is light years ahead of the laptop competition, and the moment OS X Lion’s desktop fades into view it’s impossible not to be impressed. There isn’t the slightest hint of pixel structure; not a single jagged edge to be seen. Even the individual icons on the Launchpad are so clearly defined it makes the MacBook Air 13in look like it’s slightly out of focus.

Technically, it’s near faultless. The IPS panel’s LED backlighting delivers a maximum brightness of 333cd/m2, and the contrast ratio of 1,023:1 is exemplary. Apple’s decision to factory calibrate its displays makes all the difference, too. Put to the test with our X-Rite i1Display Pro colorimeter and basICColor’s display 5 software, the display achieved an average Delta E of 1.4 and a maximum deviation of 3.4 in OS X – simply superb colour accuracy.

Apple Macbook Pro with Retina display (2012) - front

This is the most refined, colour-accurate display you’ll find on any laptop, at any price. However, there’s more to the MacBook Pro’s Retina display than mere pixels. While you’d imagine such a high resolution would make text painfully tiny, and shrink the toolbars and icons in applications to almost unusable proportions, Apple’s solution is OS-wide scaling.

In the default mode, dubbed “Best for Retina”, the MacBook Pro’s desktop effectively mimics a 1,440 x 900 pixel display: text is large and legible, and the icons are all big enough to click without fiddling – but it’s still a 2,880 x 1,800 screen, and those extra pixels make all the difference.

Fire up Safari and you’re rewarded with fonts so sharp and finely delineated it’s almost like viewing text on a printed page. In fact, text is so beautifully rendered it makes the low-resolution images on websites look in need of an upgrade. Apple’s own website solves the issue by using higher-resolution images when the browser detects it’s being viewed on a Retina display.

Applications are faced with a similar issue. Apple has already updated most of its iLife suite, Aperture and Final Cut Pro X, so they can take full advantage of the screen’s high resolution for editing photos and HD video. Other developers, such as Adobe, are promising updates very soon.

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User comments

Why have they wasted all that space?

What's the point of a tiny, cramped, keyboard, surrounded by acres of wasted space?

By qpw3141 on 19 Jun 2012

Wasted space?

qpw3141,

The keyboard is neither tiny nor cramped. It's really very good. Pop into an Apple Store and try it out in person if you're not 100% sold on it.

Kind regards,
Sasha Muller
Laptops Editor
PC Pro

By SashaMuller on 19 Jun 2012

Parts of the keyborad 54c, wristrest 37c and the base hitting 50c. Really is the "hot" product of the moment. So it will be to hot for your lap, to hot to hold. Just what are you meant to do with it. What will these temps be if we ever get a summer. What are these extend temps going to do for the reliability, its not as if we have not been down this road before. More of a baked apple.

Brilliant effort but style etc etc over function (again).

By davidk1962 on 19 Jun 2012

Not wasted

i used to think that too but when you use one the keyboard is a perfectly normal size and the large space at the front is to accommodate the stunning trackpad.
I would love this laptop but it will be a few generations before the price comes down.
A laptop that small and nicely designed playing Crysis at 32 FPS in Full HD on high settings.

Apple are extremely expensive but if you have the money to pay for it you do get an amazing piece of kit.

By TimoGunt on 19 Jun 2012

@qpw3141

It is wasted space, but the alternative is not ideal either. My Dell has the keyboard offset sideways and a numeric keypad alongside which doesn't feel quite right.

By tirons1 on 19 Jun 2012

Ahhhh here's the fruit-induced orgasmic jism....

So let's get this straight, a re-design of the case, and an ultra-hires screen makes this so wonderful.


You make very light of the many design compromises (5 stars) required to achieve the dimensions & weight-loss.
In one sense I think you're right this is PC as white goods - no user upgradeable or serviceable parts inside. Potential buyers need to understand that as FZ would have said: "It might just be a one shot deal"


I rather doubt that given the relatively small numbers that will be sold, and the litigious nature of the Fruity ones anyone will bother to develop aftermarket SSDs...

Finally you rate this as 4 stars for VFM. Well that rather depends on how important you consider having the willy-waving kudos of that screen. Personally I'm not bothered, but if I were, I'd wait for the tech to trickle-down to more sensibly-priced gear.

By wittgenfrog on 19 Jun 2012

I don't plan to switch from Windows just to enjoy the benefits of a Hi-Res screen.

It becomes useless in Windows. You can't even have a native resolution without drastically hindering useability.

By diamondmailbox on 20 Jun 2012

Untouchable

There is an interesting article here about how the user can do nothing to this laptop becuase of the way it is all bonded together.
http://m.wired.com/gadgetlab/2012/06/opinion-apple
-retina-displa/

I just don't want to have to send off my main PC for days if not weeks at the expense of approx. £200 just to have the battery replaced.

What am I supposed to do, buy two?

By Grunthos on 20 Jun 2012

5 years...

Most Apple laptops I've had tend to last about 5 years with their OS, so whilst I agree about the lack of upgradability, most users will still be using it half a decade from now.

Having said that, I also recognise this is a first-gen product when it comes to display, so wouldn't surprise me if it's superceeded in the next 12 months. I guess they wanted to get something out with Ivy Bridge before everyone else?

In terms of support, you could always get AppleCare :)

C

By Chatan on 20 Jun 2012

@wittgenfrog and @Grunthos

Serious question: What percentage of current laptop owners do you reckon ever dive inside their machine? I know I do, and I guess you probably too, but of the eleventy eleven gazillion laptops sold every year, what percentage do you think are ever opened?

My guess is that it's a long way south of one percent. And to exclude such a fractional percentage from your potential customer base is hardly marketing suicide.

Or, to put it another way, if ANY company out there know what it is doing, it's Apple.

By PaulOckenden on 20 Jun 2012

@PaulOckenden

I don't dispute that most buyers won't ever try to change\fix anything themselves. Indeed I acknowledged that this is PC as appliance (white goods).

What I was complaining about was PCPro's uncritical acceptance of all that that implies.

If you don't buy AppleCare you're going to pay big-time for any minor repairs (like a new battery?) down the line.

If you don't buy AppleCare, major repair work will be unaffordable - only geniuses will ever be able to do any serious surgery.

So in addition to the basic cost you should factor-in AppleCare. Once you do this you're starting to look at what is either a 'throwaway' when old, or a partial hardware leasing scheme.

If one does accept the premise of PC as appliance, then why not go the whole hog?
This device seems to have the disadvantages of a totally customised system without the pottential benefits of 100% custom components fully integrated into the design. Maybe that'll be next year's thing.

By wittgenfrog on 20 Jun 2012

To build a machine of this design without going custom would be, I reckon, impossible. If it had been built with standard components it would look, well, 'standard'.

It's not just Apple - other leading edge kit has to go down the same path. The Sony Vaio Z, for example, has RAM soldered onto the motherboard and uses a custom SSD design. Admittedly it uses screws rather than glue, but it does show that if you want to build a radically different house you need to take control of the bricks as well as deciding how they are laid.

By PaulOckenden on 20 Jun 2012

@PaulOckenden

All points taken, and absorbed. I'm castigating the temerity more than the novelty.

It's too custom to be readily fixable, but greater systems integration should have produced better performace...

By wittgenfrog on 20 Jun 2012

"The result is stunning, and expensive"

Bit like a high class hooker then.....

Not that I'd know you understand.

By CraigieDD on 20 Jun 2012

??

seriously wittgenfrog? do you not appreciate any future tech? or do you just stick to the cheap and cheerful? beige plastic will do?

This laptop can run for well over 10 hours and powers a very fast processor. It can play games that puts a lot of desktops to shame and does this all on a screen that packs more pixels than every 30 inch state of the art monitor going.
Do you not appreciate that this is a stunning bit of kit? Yes it's expensive and you would have to have money dribbling out of your undercarriage to buy it but it really is the best laptop you can buy bar none. It's like a Ferrari vs an Escort. Yep you'll get to the same place in an Escort but you'll get there hours later and be glad to switch the engine off at the end.

By TimoGunt on 21 Jun 2012

!!!

@timogunt
Of course its an excellent device, at £2k a pop you'd hope it would be!

I have 2 major complaints:
1. The display is a distraction, not an advance
2. It falls between two stools of component integration.

In a year every tom Dick & Samsung will have 'Ultrabooks' with equivalent dispplays. They're not necessary, or even that useful on a 15" display. Their role is to help the assistants in Dixons tick off another USP to part punters from their cash!

As to the component integration, its just a poor compromise. My opinion.

Do I prefer beige plastic, of course not! I USE computers: I earn my living managing networks, and spend many hors every day behind various screens.

I am pragmatic about technology, and I might consider a MacBook with a standard display, but never this model. 'Retina' doesn't add any value at all for what I do.

By wittgenfrog on 21 Jun 2012

@wittgenfrog

"1. The display is a distraction, not an advance."

A distraction? This is the finest display of any laptop I have ever encountered, and it betters many professional monitors by some margin, too.

For design, photography and video production professionals, the pixel density, colour accuracy and overall image quality comes as nothing short of a revelation.

Remember, this laptop manages to squeeze a professional class monitor, a seriously fast CPU/SSD and forward-thinking connectivity (Thunderbolt, USB 3) into a 2kg chassis. No other production laptop can even come close.

It may not be what you need, but then it sounds like you'd be better served by the cheaper non-Retina Pro.

And as for your prediction of every Ultrabook having a Retina display within a year, that's highly optimistic. PC manufacturers are only just starting to roll out Full-HD on their Ultrabooks. They are at least a generation behind Apple.

Methinks, someone's just trying to find excuses not to buy one! :)

Kind regards,
Sasha Muller
Laptops Editor

By SashaMuller on 21 Jun 2012

5 stars!

If this didn't have apple as the name, it would only get 4 stars.
It's hot, the GPU switcher doesn't work for Windows, no upgrade, right-click is an awkward gesture
I think dell/hp/lenovo really need to step up and copy properly

By MarkShurmer on 21 Jun 2012

@wittgenfrog

A distraction!

A distraction to you and advance to many.

Who cares about component integration. All I want from any of my kit is that it works for me. I don't care what's best for anyone else. I don't care who makes it either I choose on the basis of requirements not badge.

By njm1404 on 21 Jun 2012

expensive?

It really isn't that expensive compared to an equivalent Vaio, or even compared to a specced up normal Macbook Pro.

By gavmeister on 21 Jun 2012

@SashaMuller

As it happens I am employed in a Graphics \ Web design Studio.
Few of our staff would choose to blow £2k on a MacBook Pro if they could have a device with a 'lesser' screen, and a really BIG high-def Monitor instead.

Except under very special circumstances, graphics pros work predominantly at their desks, on multi-monitor rigs. Yes its a 'professional class nmonitor', but a very small one.
Managers, poseurs, Gadgeteers and anyone who has to have the latest 'my shiny' will of course lap-up the Retina, and they're fully entitled to do so. Great marketing.

A serious 40+ hrs per week professional graphics tool it ain't.

Perhaps YOU'RE just trying to justify buying one :-)

By wittgenfrog on 21 Jun 2012

Iv'e seen this in the flesh and naked is GOOD!

Sasha, well-done I always look forward to your reviews, they really stir things up, quite similar in some ways to the news and subsequent comments from a well-known tabloid DM. I'm a techie through and through and love new developments and technology, however I confess that occasionally I too have to pause for thought and wonder if Apple has gone too far? Then I remember the last time I used my optical drive was someone else’s use and that I haven't used a wired network connection for years. The device in my hands now is a 2.6GHz quad-core Core i7 CPU with a 512GB SSD and 16GB of RAM, it loads OSx in no time at all and virtual Windows 7 Enterprise on VMware's Fusion 4.1.3 takes less than 13 seconds to domain prompt and then 3-4 seconds for fully loaded desktop, it's quite amazing. My only negative comments are 1. Regarding the gluing of the batteries to the inside facia, from what I see it looks like you would need to replace the top facia if you wanted to replace them, which is serious surgery and way beyond the ability of a typical user and even some engineers. 2. The 2 thunderbolt displays I purchased last year are fantastic, but only support 2560x1440 compared to this new 2880×1800 on a screen nearly half the size. So what I want to see later this year is an upgrade to the thunderbolt display with a possible UHD 7680x4320 using retina technology. Ha Ha Ha when will it ever end!!!

By TOPMAN on 21 Jun 2012

@wittgenfrog

I do take your point. But I do also think that £1800 is very, very reasonable when you compare it to the Windows-powered laptops on the market. It's insanely reasonable when you consider that the standard 15in Pro is £1500. No one in their right mind would accuse either of those laptops of being overpriced, and certainly not if they took a long hard look at the competition.

If you want a well-designed laptop with a quad-core Ivy Bridge CPU and a fast SSD, you will easily be paying £1000+. Easily. If you want a colour-accurate IPS screen, too - and I'm not sure a Windows laptop with such a display even exists - then you'll be paying much, much more. Not to mention that a proper high-end desktop display costs the best part of £1500 on its own - saving a few hundred quid by buying a Windows laptop, a cheaper Mac or a even desktop PC seems like a false economy to me.

I'm sure many professionals will love the Retina Pro - not just gadgeteers, poseurs and bonus-happy bankers. After all, while a 30in Eizo is great on a desk, it's not so hot when you're out on a location shoot. Bit bulky, and you'll need a really long mains lead.

Depending on your needs, this very well could be the centre of a very high-end graphics workstation. At the desk, it's quite powerful enough to power multiple high-res displays and handle any current software. The presence of Thunderbolt/USB 3 permits the high-speed external storage that such pros might need. Difference is, you can pick it up and carry it around all day knowing that it'll still provide a pro level of performance across the board while on location.

For £1799, this level of quality and performance is unheard of. I'm frankly surprised that you're not more sold on the idea given your line of work! Still, thanks for taking the time to comment. It's always rewarding to see things from another point of view, however different to my own. That's why the comment facility is here!

Kind regards,
Sasha Muller
Laptops Editor
PC Pro

By SashaMuller on 21 Jun 2012

@gavmeister

......Vs Sony Vaio

I had this argument the other day. Turns out the Z series when specced up the same (obviously minus the retina display) costs the same. Go figure!

By pveater on 21 Jun 2012

Hopefully where all displays will be in a few years

The display is incredible, first iPhone, then iPad, now laptop size... let's hope the next stage up is desktop, providing yields are high enough. Apple are really pushing resolution forward. We've put up with 72/96ppi screens for a very long time, finally now we can have something approaching printed media to edit photos and video directly. I regularly deal with 50Mb+ RAW images and retouching (or even just viewing to sort the wheat from the chaff for critical focus) on such a high res screen will be a huge boon. Soft proofing InDesign and press-ready PDFs may well save proof-printing via such a on-screen resolution. However I think the omission of wired Ethernet is odd, I have no desire to shift gigs of images from NAS over wi-fi, it's just not practical. The lack of user upgrades (battery, HD, RAM) and the SSD only option are also an issue, but I appreciate the sacrifice for design. It's tempting to buy as a first generation, but I'd have to shell out a small fortune updating my suite to CS6 (which hopefully will receive a retina optimisation patch soon...). The issue of boot camp/windows is really a non-starter, I can't see anyone buying this device only booting to non-optimised Windows over OS X, Parallels or VMWare would be the way to go should you need access to Windows/Win only software.

By isofa on 21 Jun 2012

Zoomed up text scroll jitters.

I noticed in the apple store on the low end model that when you zoom up to full on safari to read this review. When you scroll up or down the text actually jitters uncomfortably. Has anyone noticed it?
I have been using the high resolution antiglare macbook pro early 2011 model and never experienced it.

By anidoctor on 21 Jun 2012

Excellent review of a thorougly drool worthy product that is seriously tempting me to once again raid the piggy bank.
Good of you to keep answering your critics Sasha even when it is obvious they are not interested in listening.
I always find it amusing to read how all the haters who will never pay to have the best tech available are supposedly 'IT consulatants or network directors for large multi-nationals!' Really? Like trying to convince everyone that running a 3year old Dell actually makes them seem credible.
I guess they never quite realise how cringeworthy they come across.

By gorgeousninja on 22 Jun 2012

Not Green

If you can't upgrade it yourself or it can't be upgraded then it's not green in anyway.

Opening it risks breaking various parts inside - why open it? it's all soldered or glued down - if it breaks you have to buy a new one.

By nicomo on 22 Jun 2012

@SashaMuller's judging skills

SashaMuller: wrote on 220DPI screen in 2012:
(...)The MacBook Pro’s 220ppi density is light years ahead of the laptop competition(...)
(...)This is the finest display of any laptop I have ever encountered(...)

SashaMuller: wrote on 221DPI screen in 2009:
(...)but it's not quite as wonderful as it first sounds(...)
(...)unless you're glued to the screen it makes reading text very, very difficult(...)
(...)a lower resolution screen, proves far more usable(...)

I am sorry to say it, but I h8 you Sasha - you are mac-possessed.

By stasi47 on 22 Jun 2012

@stasi47

I presume you're referring to the Sony P Series, that slightly bonkers netbook hybrid from 2009. It had an ultra-widescreen 8in display and a 1600 x 768 pixel resolution. It was a crazy idea which didn't quite work.

Anyway, the key here is the implementation of OS-wide scaling. It works rather well in OS X, for the reasons I stated in the review.

Also, for the record, I don't own any Apple products. Although, in the interests of full disclosure, I did buy my girlfriend an iPod Touch a few years back. It's very nice.

Kind regards,
Sasha Muller
Laptops Editor
PC Pro

By SashaMuller on 23 Jun 2012

Expensive jewellery

Unfortunately I think this product is great in some none essential ways, but fails in some essential ones. The most critical one is the lack of a built in DVD writer.

I was actually considering a Macbookpro as I was becomming frustrated with windows, however based on the above specification, I now feel much less tempted to make the move. Although the DVD drive is not the most frequently used item, it is something that is pretty much essential in my line of business (photography). While having a hi res display is nice, I can (and do) currently function without one - nice, but not essential. The lack of a DVD drive however is a game breaker as it is essential. The lack of the ability to change the battery/ram is also a pain, and in the case of the battery life, you had better hope that is long enough to be practical.

Even for domestic users however, many people are very much into blue ray dvd these days. For someone working and spending a night away, the ability to play dvds on the laptop is as a method of passing the evenings is well liked. However with this new set up the only way you could do that is with an external drive, which kind of knocks the whole concept of "portability" on the head.

Don't get me wrong, I am not one of the anti Mac people. I was infact thinking of changing, but based on the latest products, that is now extremly unlikely. The lack of a disk drive is something you might expect from a cheap netbook, but not from a computer that costs more than £1700.

By PeterD80 on 23 Jun 2012

buy the external one then?

I'll be honest. If you have the money for this and it's only the DVD driver you're missing then buy the external drive that Apple sells for £60.
If you need constant DVD use then get the other MacBook Pros that include the DVD drive. It's only the retina one that doesn't have it. No excuse now?
The battery lasts over 10 hours of light use so it's like carrying 3 standard laptop batteries with you. Even after years it will last longer than most new laptop batteries.

By TimoGunt on 25 Jun 2012

@TimoGunt

"...The battery lasts over 10 hours of light use so it's like carrying 3 standard laptop batteries with you...."


In the interests of avoiding 'Turf warfare' I hads stopped posting, but I can't let your comment go.

This was released last week, I don't see how you can substantiate these claims, other than the first one (10 hrs life).

When you say its like carrying '3 standard laptops' what do you mean?

This Macbook is built using Off-the-shelf Intel Ultrabook technology. Its USP is a relatively power-hungry display, so all other things being equal, there's little reason to believe that its battery-life will be 3 x that of other Ultrabook type devices. Logic suggests otherwise....

Have you just stepped out of your Time Machine from the future? No? Well how do you know that
"Even after years it will last longer than most new laptop batteries..."
or are you psychic?

This kind of hyperbolic nonsense borders on trolling.

If the things so bloody marvellous, you don't need to make these silly claims.

Apple's only going to \ can only make relatively few of these for a variety of reasons. They'll all sell whatever....

By wittgenfrog on 26 Jun 2012

Apologies for random line feeds.

Line-soacing seems pretty random....
Why

is
that?

By wittgenfrog on 26 Jun 2012

Colour Accuracy

According to Anandtech the new MacBook Pro display has lower colour accuracy than the old one:

http://www.anandtech.com/show/6023/the-nextgen-mac
book-pro-with-retina-display-review/5

It seems the Asus UX21A which uses a 1920X1080 11.6" IPS panel,seems to be the most colour accurate laptop panel,Anandtech has tested ATM.It also a 190ppi density,which means the MacBook Pro is only around 16% more..

By KITTYBOTS2000 on 26 Jun 2012

Colour Accuracy

According to Anandtech the new MacBook Pro display has lower colour accuracy than the old one:

http://www.anandtech.com/show/6023/the-nextgen-mac
book-pro-with-retina-display-review/5

It seems the Asus UX21A which uses a 1920X1080 11.6" IPS panel,seems to be the most colour accurate laptop panel,Anandtech has tested ATM.It also a 190ppi density,which means the MacBook Pro is only around 16% more..

By KITTYBOTS2000 on 26 Jun 2012

"This laptop can run for well over 10 hours and powers a very fast processor."

This describes pretty much any ultrabook.

If the retina display has detail that the human eye cannot perceive (as I understand it), doesn't it mean that laptop screens have/will soon plateau?

No point in cramming even more detail in is there?

By Alfresco on 29 Jun 2012

"This laptop can run for well over 10 hours and powers a very fast processor."

This describes pretty much any ultrabook.

If the retina display has detail that the human eye cannot perceive (as I understand it), doesn't it mean that laptop screens have/will soon plateau?

No point in cramming even more detail in is there?

By Alfresco on 29 Jun 2012

So much Hype!!! But what does it mean... Yes its a great machineno denying but its value to most people is questionable. Its like when Compact cameras advertise 20 Megapixels etc. People think they're getting some of amzing when really they're wasting the money. Unless you're professional photographer or film maker retina displays for the price range is just totally over the top. 5 stars.. nah... I think 4 would have been a more sane rating... I see just more Apple fever here. don't get me wrong I own an i-pad, mac and pc all are useful and serve their purpose. And that the word. purpose. Calm down people.

By DynaMikeOmega on 16 Jul 2012

So much Hype!!! But what does it mean... Yes its a great machineno denying but its value to most people is questionable. Its like when Compact cameras advertise 20 Megapixels etc. People think they're getting some of amzing when really they're wasting the money. Unless you're professional photographer or film maker retina displays for the price range is just totally over the top. 6 stars.. nah... I think 4 or 5 tops would have been a more sane rating... I see just more Apple fever here. don't get me wrong I own an i-pad, mac and pc all are useful and serve their purpose. And that the word. purpose. Calm down people.

By DynaMikeOmega on 16 Jul 2012

The value of retina display

Retina display is an incredible leap forward for professional designers. I love using it as it saves zooming in and out.

Every single person that has seen my screen says it is amazing. Even those used to iPad3 say this display is incredible.

Hopefully the technology will become standard - a bit like how non-apple phones often have a high resolution screen now.

By Duncanbaines on 25 Aug 2012

So tempted, reservations exist

Having recently added to the family, the desktop PC and accompanying desk and chair are in danger of being in the valuable space we now need.

I've been looking over laptops to see what is available and obviously the Mac Book comes up again and again. Irrespective of the initial price, which is comparable to similarly specified ultra-books.

The resolution of the Retina display is gorgeous, but is it enough to swing towards an Apple device?

The two things that hold me back are OSX, although this could be circumvented with Boot Camp and the fixed hardware.

The 13" Mac Book Pro, retailing at £1499, comes with a paltry 128GB SSD, a higher capacity drive seems to be hugely overpriced if chosen as an option from the Mac Store, yet they warn you when buying that it cannot be upgraded later. I do not know whether this is true.

The second thing that turns me from Apple is the deviation from agreed standards, preferring to go with their own connections and producing adaptors for those connections at a high retail cost. Very frustrating. It's more an investment than nipping down to your local shop to buy a USB cable.

By Gogster on 29 Nov 2012

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