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Pensioner targeted by fake virus phone scam

Old man hands

By Stuart Turton

Posted on 29 Mar 2010 at 14:22

A PC Pro reader was left startled after a customer support company rang his grandfather to tell him there was a virus on his PC, and then tried to charge him £185 to remove it.

The story was related to PC Pro by reader Mike McCartney, who claimed that technical support firm The Nerd Support spent two hours on the phone with his 80-year-old grandfather, walking him through the process of downloading and installing a remote desktop application to find the supposed fault.

"He had never contacted them previously, nor had he ever been on their website," said Mike McCartney. "I had only just taught him how to switch the computer on and get onto Google, he did not even have email at this point.

They showed him a fake list of faults a full-page long, then directed him to a payment area for a bill of £185

"They showed him a fake list of faults a full-page long, then directed him to a payment area for a bill of £185," related McCartney, who arrived just in time to stop the payment.

According to The Nerd Support's homepage the £185 buys one year's worth of support, however, a closer look at the company's Terms of Service reveals some worrying clauses. "The Nerd Support Group reserve the right to cancel service at any time with no prior notice, for any reason they, in their sole discretion, deem appropriate," it said.

"You agree, as our client, to be financially responsible for all services rendered. You also agree to refrain from requesting 'charge-backs' or canceling any fees or service charges paid for with your credit card," it continued.

That's not all that's suspect about the company's website. The Customer Testimonials and FAQs pages are copied from other websites, including iYogi - a legitimate customer support company - and amusingly still offer that company's phone number.

We contacted The Nerd Support ourselves using the company's 0203 "freephone" number (which isn't actually free), which took us to a foreign-language menu system. Blindly pressing numbers led us to a customer service advisor who claimed to be based in London, but refused to give us a company address, or answer our questions, before hanging up.

The company is not registered at Companies House, and a WHOIS search directed us to domain registrar GoDaddy.

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User comments

One step more

@Stuart: the generic record you accessed, the master whois server is given as who.godaddy.com

Go one step further and search the domain name on that server and you will find a Rajasthan registered address with another (Indian mobile) phone number for you to call.

By lokash20 on 29 Mar 2010

though it appears that...

domainsbyproxy.com are in the loop so there's no guarantee that number will work.

Good luck! :-)

By lokash20 on 29 Mar 2010

there's more for you to investigate

My mother-in-law got an identical phone call, though fortunately she was shrewd and savvy enough to tell the caller to take a hike.

My question is, how were these customers targeted so quickly after they got a PC? My mother in law never got a call like that before signing up with O2 for email. I wonder if this reader's grandad was also newly signed up to an ISP?

In which case, the bigger question is, where are these hoaxers getting the contact details?

By Noghar on 29 Mar 2010

This is about my Grandad

hi, im mike who sent in the information.

@noghar yes he had just got the isp (virgin) i have had talks with them as clearly the information was leaked on there side not ours

By dracz on 29 Mar 2010

Fake Microsoft Call?

Irecently purchased a new Sony all in one primarily for my wife to use(PC World).
About three weeks later I got this call from a gentleman with a heavy Indian accent, I could hardly make out what he was saying. The jist of it was, he was calling from Microsoft and they had identified that my PC had a serious fault which would cause it to stop working unless it was fixed. They offered to talk me through the procedure.
I think I know what I'm doing with PCs having worked in IT support so I told the caller that I was sure i had no problem. He wouldn't take know for an answer and in the end I had to put the phone down on him.
Somebody knew I had purchased a new PC and also my phone number. THis is a worrying development.

By peterhb1 on 29 Mar 2010

There's something suspicious here.

By steviesteveo on 29 Mar 2010

Happened to my parents too

Just rang my mum to warn her and she told me "Oh, they already tried it here last week but your dad answered the phone and when he asked them where they were calling from they got evasive so he hung up on them - you know how he gets!" Lol!

I told them if they ring again to tell them they already have a tech support service and it's a lot cheaper - me!

By mviracca on 29 Mar 2010

Nearly happened to at least 2 of my customers

I have had a couple of my customers ring me and ask about this and I have asked them to get the company to ring back when I'm there. Fraudulent b@st@rds.

By pipster2000 on 29 Mar 2010

Suspect posts..

Those last 3 posts look highly suspect, all 3 have similar grammar issues. Might be an idea to look a bit closer, they sound like the same person to me.

By pinero50 on 30 Mar 2010

This is where the BBC is failing us

Where is the PC user programme on prime time BBC?
We've not had a computer programme since Micro Live in the 1980's, yet every household has a PC and people like my mother-in-law would love a weekly programme to explain all the jargon and give easy to follow advice.
Public service broadcaster? Or lottery company stooge?

By cheysuli on 30 Mar 2010

Snap!

My mum has received a couple of similar calls in the last two months. The only computer in the house is my brother's, which I built myself, and they've been with Virgin Media since the days of Blueyonder, Telewest and United Artists before that. So no new ISP agreements and no new hardware.

I got the impression it was a speculative cold-call.

By clen_peapus on 30 Mar 2010

@cheysuli. The BBC Program is called Click (online).

Just do a google for BBC Click Online.

By Macer71 on 30 Mar 2010

@cheysuli. The BBC Program is called Click (online).

Just do a google for BBC Click Online.

By Macer71 on 30 Mar 2010

A simple solution

Perhaps the fans of this service could tell us what the name of the firm that billed them is, on their credit-card statements? That would help to track this company via the Credit Card co' and Companies House. After all, it's just as likely that the scammers are blackening the name of a legitimate support firm, as it is that the original report here is a fake reputation-buster for an otherwise legitimate operation.

By Steve_Cassidy on 30 Mar 2010

Funny how completely computer illiterate new PC owners who had to have help from Nerd Support to fix their new PCs suddenly know of and post on the PC Pro website! Nerd Support sound like a bunch if con artists if you ask me. The software they get people to download is programmed to say there are problems, so of course the call to Nerd Support "fixes" it.

Statistically though it is probably true that most PCs will have some malware on them, honeypot experiments show PCs being infected within 53 seconds of being connected to the internet. A client of mine who works in a big multinational got a new OC through work and it was infected with a virus before he could even install the MS updates for it on first switch on. He now uses a Linux box.

By SwissMac on 30 Mar 2010

Sorry, that typo should have said "got a new PC through work".

By SwissMac on 30 Mar 2010

Someone is fighting back!

If we take "Jennifer's" quote:-
"they diagnosis the problem coming with my PC and given a quick"
There is little doubt the posters first language is not English!
This mustr be a BIG SCAM to put so much effort into trying to refute it.

By milliganp on 30 Mar 2010

Click (Online) -Surely Not!

@Macer71 -this is perhaps the most brain-dead program on the BBC, the standard of knowledge and journalism is dire (IMHO).

By milliganp on 30 Mar 2010

Let's take it calmly chaps

Milliganp: Bad or non-native english is not a sign of dishonesty, in and of itself. I agree, they are having a fightback, but I don't agree there's lots of effort there: the fact they found us that quickly may have something to do with te ease of finding PC Pro articles via search engines. In fact, we'd rather it was *low* effort fightback...!

By Steve_Cassidy on 30 Mar 2010

@Pinero50 @milliganp @steve_cassidy

Where are you guys looking? I can't seem to figure out what posts you are talking about? I thought pinero50 meant my post above was dodgy and nearly took offence! I've looked on the testimonials page and can't find this 'Jennifer'.

Must be getting old, sniff.

By mviracca on 30 Mar 2010

@ mviracca - my fault

@ mviracca

Sorry about the confusion, that's my fault. We removed the posts in question. We don't mind companies commenting on these boards, so long as they're up front about who they are.

Posting as satisfied users is something we frown on. I should have made it clear when I took the posts down.

Stuart Turton - PC Pro news editor

By Stuart Turton on 30 Mar 2010

Ah thanks!

Thought I was losing my marbles!

(Actually, I probably am but I rarely notice anymore!)

By mviracca on 30 Mar 2010

swissmac, you're missing the point

It's not the PC newbies who are logging on here to report scams. It's us expereinced users advising older PC newbies. But you are right, it is a straightforward scam. The PC newbies who don't have advisers are very likely the ones getting ripped off and not reporting it to anyone.

However, is it likely that these scammers are just ringing anyone over the age of 60 and telling them they have a virus on their PC - even people who don't have one? Or do they somehow have access to the date of birth and phone no of their victims?

By Noghar on 31 Mar 2010

Re: Click (Online) -Surely Not!

@milliganp - Hey, I didn't say it was a quality program, just that the BBC do have a technology show aimed at PC Users.

By Macer71 on 31 Mar 2010

More than one site doing this?

(better make sure I get my grammar and spelling correct!)

If you go to TheNerdSupport website, and select some of the blurb on the front page (e.g. where it says "The Nerd Support Group provides Preventive maintenance is one of the most ignored aspects of PC ownership, in my opinion") and do a Google search, you find quite a few other "pc repair" sites, so I suspect this is one group of individuals who have setup multiple sites.

It was the "in my opinion" bit which seemed suspicious i.e. seemed as though it had been copied from another website.

Here are some of their other sites:

http://www.pctechla.com/
http://www.clandeals.co.uk/
http://xpertpcservices.com/ExpertPC%20Services_pag
e0005.htm
http://www.onsite-techsupport.net/mplan.html

Mind you, they may not all be dodgy – they may all have just copied text from the same source...!

By DournP on 1 Apr 2010

It happened to me - sort of!

Funnily enough I got a phone call from an outfit like the one mentioned here. They seemed to ignore my opening greeting (highlighting the fact that we are an IT company) and proceeded to tell me I had a virus on my PC that they could fix for me.

After a couple of minutes of 'winding him up' I admitted that I was an IT Engineer by profession and I wanted some more details about how he knew so much about my very secure computers. Not to my suprise the phone line went very quiet, then he hung up!

Since then I have been contacted by a number of my customers complaining about 'cold callers' offering to fix their PC by remote assitance. They immediately contacted me and I told thm what to say (can't be repeated here), and this seemed to do the trick.

From my own experience, and my customers, this is a total scam - but it does beg the question, how many times do they get away with it?

Cold calling any phone numbers like this there is a good chance that the person answering does have a PC in the house so the hit rate must be high. I don't think there is a conspiracy by the ISPs to sell on PC users details, merely a case of phone enought telephone numbers and someone, somwhere will get their credit card out and be conned. Then again...

By tacticalpanda on 1 Apr 2010

It happened to me - sort of!

Funnily enough I got a phone call from an outfit like the one mentioned here. They seemed to ignore my opening greeting (highlighting the fact that we are an IT company) and proceeded to tell me I had a virus on my PC that they could fix for me.

After a couple of minutes of 'winding him up' I admitted that I was an IT Engineer by profession and I wanted some more details about how he knew so much about my very secure computers. Not to my suprise the phone line went very quiet, then he hung up!

Since then I have been contacted by a number of my customers complaining about 'cold callers' offering to fix their PC by remote assitance. They immediately contacted me and I told thm what to say (can't be repeated here), and this seemed to do the trick.

From my own experience, and my customers, this is a total scam - but it does beg the question, how many times do they get away with it?

Cold calling any phone numbers like this there is a good chance that the person answering does have a PC in the house so the hit rate must be high. I don't think there is a conspiracy by the ISPs to sell on PC users details, merely a case of phone enought telephone numbers and someone, somwhere will get their credit card out and be conned. Then again...

By tacticalpanda on 1 Apr 2010

ANOTHER similar story

Not for the first time, I had one of these calls earlier this week. I was told that after paying the fee of £69 I would get a year of online remote support from a Microsoft certified technician. I was asked to go through various pre-diagnostic steps such as "eventvwr" to show me the issue was genuine. I kept the guy on the line - his call - for about 45 minutes, whilst having no intention of taking it further. He did let slip a web address = www.soc321.com so watch out for this.

By nickvalentine on 1 Apr 2010

Moile phone cams

Dare I even suggest that the best solution for these crooks is a permanent one. The phone compan ies should take more responsibility instead of just raking in profits.

By pcdiver on 1 Apr 2010

Are they actually a Microsoft registered partner

Not sure MS would be too happy about these w**kers were using their brand if not

By Liamchew on 1 Apr 2010

And yet again!

Same as Nick Valentine I was cold called by someone giving the impression that they were from Microsoft responding to error reports that I had sent, advising that there was a windows loop hole that they could solve with their software.
When challenged whether or not they were employees of Microsoft they quickly said no they were MS Certified and confirmed that I would have to pay £69 for each of my computers annually.
I made a note of the company which was Pointstone Quick Maintenance whose offer I declined - but the trend is very worrying.

By Megawattuk on 1 Apr 2010

Doh! It happened to me too!

I found this story by accident, but it explains what that wierd call from India was all about. I was slightly suspicious when they couldn't confirm what brand of PC I was using (homebuilt). I asked two more questions and surprise suprise, they hung up. Dialling 1471 reveal "We do not have the number". 'Nuff said!
Has anyone seen anything on the news or consumer programmes about this? Should we all be emailing watchdog@bbc.co.uk?

By ceedee on 1 Apr 2010

phone scam

I had a call last week,number withheld.
She got as far as saying I had some problems with my computer when I said no I have not,goodbye! and put the phone down.
An Asian accent and a delay in connection when I lifted the receiver was enough to set the alarm bells ringing.

By UK_Snapper on 1 Apr 2010

A plague has come on us!

Did a search on the string "most ignored aspects of PC ownership" and found 5 pages of links. Some variation of surrounding text ('PM' or 'Periodic maintenance' o.s.o. 'Preventative..." but still an amazing number of "opinions".

Either they're mostly crooks or they are mostly plagiarists. On the other hand, we techhies are not really known for our literacy or originality.

By pofadda on 1 Apr 2010

Standard Advise

I used to build and upgrade PCs and I would always tell people, "always be suspisious of calls out of the blue from companies you don't have dealings with, mail claiming you have won a prize when you have not entered a competition and E-mails from companies to whom you have never given your address to as well as banks and credit card companies asking for security info as they would never contact you via E-mail". seems like they have access to the database used by market research companies or just picking numbers from a phone directory at random.

By jayscsi on 1 Apr 2010

How Secure

are these call centres in India etc? Obviously to do the job they must have access to subscriber details; what's to stop those details walking out of the door (on a memory stick for example)?

By RHope on 1 Apr 2010

How Secure

are these call centres in India etc? Obviously to do the job they must have access to subscriber details; what's to stop those details walking out of the door (on a memory stick for example)?

By RHope on 1 Apr 2010

They apparently don't support Win7 as an OS, if you look on their supported technologies page.

By qwertyqwerty87 on 1 Apr 2010

Just happened to me today: 01/04/2010

They called me today, claiming that I had phoned them up for support about 2 weeks ago. I asked instantly is this an april fools joke? they replied no. A woman spoke to me first directing me to go to their website "www.thenerdsupport.com", so I followed her instructions and accepted this TeamViewerQS.exe and then a man took over. All they acutally showed me was some error log, that I knew instantly weren't viruses. They told me to get rid of these I would need a new anti virus system for a £185 that would last 10 years. Baring in mind that I pay for AVG 9.0 latest out at the moment. Anyway I did some research and found out they were a con. I've contacted my local police, which came to my house to have a look at their site and I am pleased to say that they are opening up an investigation to try and catch them out. If TeamViewerQS.exe causes damage can someone please tell me, as I have basic knowledge on computers.

By JamieShaneK on 1 Apr 2010

Similar problem

A friend of mine had a similar occurance where the caller asked them to open a file on their computer and type in a password so the caller could check over their computer.
The caller said my friend had downloaded some illegal files and they needed to be deleted by an expert. They explained at great length that if the computer was taken to somewhere like PC World the chances were that it would be checked for illegal files and if found they would probably be arrested.
In all they made 3 calls over the week in an attempt to get control of the computer. They said the charge of £185 would be the total charge for cleaning the computer and checking it again every month for the next year.
They wanted credit card details for immediate payment and the computer must be left wirelessly under their control.
Apparently they were very convincing but she did not give them any details as she felt they were trying to convince her just too much - a real hard sell.
If they get you to download a file don't open it, just delete it.

By jem124 on 1 Apr 2010

Similar problem

A friend of mine had a similar occurance where the caller asked them to open a file on their computer and type in a password so the caller could check over their computer.
The caller said my friend had downloaded some illegal files and they needed to be deleted by an expert. They explained at great length that if the computer was taken to somewhere like PC World the chances were that it would be checked for illegal files and if found they would probably be arrested.
In all they made 3 calls over the week in an attempt to get control of the computer. They said the charge of £185 would be the total charge for cleaning the computer and checking it again every month for the next year.
They wanted credit card details for immediate payment and the computer must be left wirelessly under their control.
Apparently they were very convincing but she did not give them any details as she felt they were trying to convince her just too much - a real hard sell.
If they get you to download a file don't open it, just delete it.

By jem124 on 1 Apr 2010

thenerdsupport.com fake blog

Follow the link to the "blog" at the bottom of thenerdsupport.com webpage. A single entry blog with lots of tips for tech support guys such as "If possible ask to speak to the youngest person present" and that your job is to get the truth from a customer "so you can rub the lie in their face, fixing the issue is just a perk". Hoho.

By MonkeyMagic on 1 Apr 2010

thenerdsupport.com fake blog

Follow the link to the "blog" at the bottom of thenerdsupport.com webpage. A single entry blog with lots of tips for tech support guys such as "If possible ask to speak to the youngest person present" and that your job is to get the truth from a customer "so you can rub the lie in their face, fixing the issue is just a perk". Hoho.

By MonkeyMagic on 1 Apr 2010

Sharing and scary

I am sure sharing of information is common. As my phone contract gets close to its anniversary I get many calls from companies offering "deals".

But the scary thing about this is running an .exe file from these companies. I have recently spent several hours removing fake virus alerts from computers of friends. These things involved redirecting any attempt to run an exe file through their program first before deciding what would happen - often another virus warning with preventing virus and bot searches from working. A proxy had also been configured so that any internet connection was routed through the local PC and vetted before being allowed. And this was all with the users being unaware that it had happened or how it had happened. Clicking on "Yes please." when running an exe file means that anything is possible.

By Marfie on 2 Apr 2010

Away to stop Cold calling

Hi this site may be of some support to everyone who gets cold callers. I have used this service for a number of years as it is illegal to cold call if you do have registered with them.
http://www.callpreventionregistry.co.uk
This as far as I know a government or government supported site.

By Burnhard999 on 3 Apr 2010

Away to stop cold calling

HI Please ignore the last email. That is a site that charges you.

This site below is the one that is supported by the Government
http://www.mpsonline.org.uk/tps/

By Burnhard999 on 3 Apr 2010

Arthur56

I have had a number of phonecalls from people from Asia and when you ring 1471 to ring back the number is unobtainable,mine started when a company called PC Handshake signed me up for PC Support to look after my computer they stated that should I have some viruses they could get rid of them ,so like a idiot I went for the service,I found the company on the computer I thought I was safe. My computer was having problems at the time,when I contacted them I spent 3hrs 43minutes on the phone during this time he deleted lots of things from the machine stating he would help get them back he then said he would ring back the next day which was Saturday.I waited nothing Sunday nothing first thing Monday I again rang and was told that they do not work over weekends unless I pay extra,I told them to stick it and cancel my agreement.I wrote to them.I also cancelled my credit cards saying that I had lost it and could they re-issue with another number.Some weeks later I started getting calls threatening me,because my credit card had been cancelled this went on for months then stopped I spoke to trading standards they advised me but even to this day I keep getting phone calls from similar numbers which are not issued in this Country but India they have used various names including Nerd,but I am sure they are all from the same place,we they speak it is sometimes like a call centre.

By Arthur56 on 5 Apr 2010

The Police should be informed more often

This happened to me too last month, but the indian bloke on the other end would not answer my questions so i put the phone down.
I think what the previous user did, 'JamieShaneK 1st April' was a good move and if more people contacted the police then maybe something more possitive could be done to avoid this happening as often as it does.
When if affect the elderly in a large scale then something should be done about the cons that go on.

By annjenkins1606 on 5 Apr 2010

Arthur56

You are now on a list of mugs who respond to cold calls and will never get off it. The only way to handle it is to hang up immediately you get a cold call - do not try to be polite to them, be as rude to them as they have been to you.

I have to provide constant support to my Mother-in-Law who responded once, many years ago. It has been getting easier for her lately as a result of her deafness - if she does hear the phone ringing, she can only rarely understand what they are saying.

By bobellsmore on 6 Apr 2010

avg

Many people I know use free avg I used to. A friend who had just started on surfing and a quick learner. He clicked on one of those you are the xxxx customer and have won...etc. He then recieved a msg from avg saying that his computer had a virus and that he must subcribe and pay to get rid of it. I think we managed to sort it without avgs help. I know it isn't a blatant scam but surely its not right to hold people to ransom. If you don't have access to a credit card what then?

By richcrudginton on 6 Apr 2010

Want to share my expierence

I am shocked to learn that people have time to attempt such type of scams. But i totally disagree that nerd support is included in this scam, because i am using their tech support services and really they are great in their work and i have never found any problems with them .It seems someone is running a malicious campaign to spoil the image of this company. Last week I also got a call from someone claiming to be from Nerd Support and selling me their services. How can this be right when I am already their customer? I smell fish in this. Beware of such type of calls that says they are from nerd support.

By johnlehman on 23 Apr 2010

Stopping cold calling

@Burnhard999

Being registered on TPS (Telephone Preference Service) doesn't stop these calls. I have two phones at home both registered on TPS for over two years.

Last month I had at least 7 calls wanting to fix my Sky box or sell me breakdown insurance for my Sky equipment. I don't have a Sky box and there has never been a Sky box associated with either telephone number.

This month I've already had two calls wanting to rid my PC of viruses/malware by having a technician connect remotely to my system.

From information given during these conversations I believe these people are cold calling, probably from a telephone directory and are unaware of or do not care about TPS.

By joe90uk on 25 Apr 2010

when i need assistance

Before some days ago,my pc was not working well because of some virus issues then i came to know about the nerd support and their services and now i am using their services and i have no virus issues .i am very thankful to the nerd support .there are many scammers that are selling such type of services ,please beware of such type of cold calling scam .

By fabolasmith on 28 Apr 2010

Put this scum inside

I cannot understand how these people are allowed to operate. I have had several customers, all elderly, taken by these people using scare tactics. In each case they got a call from somebody telling them they have all sorts of problems on their computer and then take £180+ for removing it. They always take the payment from a debit card, never a credit card. I have spoken to the banks who just do not want to know. Why cannot they be traced through the card transaction, the banks can tell where the money has gone to and also freeze the money. They can get the account owners details, which can be passed on to the police. The public need to be made aware of this scam. I would like to see Mr Dennis use his influence via his many pulbications to inform the public of this problem. As a previous contributor remarked we need a prime time TV program bringing this and other such scams to the publics attention. Get Microsoft involved as I am sure the contact details theses people are using are coming from hacked online email accounts, such as hotmail. Put this scum inside where they belong.

By picket on 30 Apr 2010

Is it Legal to associate yourself with Microsoft?

TheNerdSupport.com called me, stating they work on behalf of Microsoft, so I told them to call me back in an hour. This gave me the time to check out whether they were legit... I checked their Website which states that they are a "Microsoft Registered Partner". This all seems very convincing. Is it legal to associate yourself with a company such as Micrsoft? Incidentally, I think the company works by targeting the vulnerable, but this is just my opinion. I won't be using their services.

By laur48 on 30 Apr 2010

Is it Legal to associate yourself with Microsoft?

TheNerdSupport.com called me, stating they work on behalf of Microsoft, so I told them to call me back in an hour. This gave me the time to check out whether they were legit... I checked their Website which states that they are a "Microsoft Registered Partner". This all seems very convincing. Is it legal to associate yourself with a company such as Micrsoft? Incidentally, I think the company works by targeting the vulnerable, but this is just my opinion. I won't be using their services.

By laur48 on 30 Apr 2010

Scammer's info source?

Very interesting reading, my sympathy to the victims.

It's my guess that these scammers get this info illegally from call centres operating in India & region.
This is known to have happened to some Banks, so is likely happening to other companies also (as per RHope's post above).


the Attorney General's National Fraud Authority website gives links to actionfraud.org.uk
http://www.attorneygeneral.gov.uk/nfa/Pages/defaul
t.aspx



http://www.actionfraud.org.uk

By Skeptick on 25 May 2010

New Indian phone scam

Here’s a new (and very laughable) phone scam from India.

Having previously suffered from (i) promises to refund from the UK Ministry of Justice £300 of bank charges illegally charged, processed via India for a processing fee (despite the fact I have never been charged any such charges); and (ii) the gentleman from “Microsoft” in India, working with my ISP, to defeat the computer viruses that have infected my computer (I played along and told them that, my ISP was “Oracle” so 30 seconds later he was claiming he was from Oracle and Microsoft), today as a reward for being a responsible citizen and maintaining a good credit record, the UK Ministry of Justice has authorised a payment of £2000 to be made to me by cheque.

In order to release this reward I needed to pay the tax on it, which was to be processed via New Delhi. Normally the government tax on £2000 would be £50, but today only, it would be £25 (such a bargain!!). Having been passed to a “supervisor” I was told I needed to wire this money via Western Union to Hitesh Walia in New Delhi, and the cheque would be with me from India within 3 hours of doing this (no, really). Asked how soon I could get to a Western Union I said about 20 mins (not really!!), and Mr. Scamster promised to phone back in 30 minutes once I had received the 10 digit transmission code receipt from Western Union.

30 minutes later I explained that Western Union would not process the payment without either a phone number or address as there was more than one Hitesh Walia in New Delhi. Mr Scamster refused to give a phone number as they were “not set up to receive incoming calls”, but did give me the address of 64 GB Road, New Delhi 110020, India (whether this is a true address or not, I do not know).

Tomorrow we will no doubt continue our amusing phone conversation, but this afternoon I passed all the details to my local police and will pass on any further info I get tomorrow.

Hitesh Walia = Indian £2000 phone scam

By ISC23 on 8 Jul 2010

New Indian phone scam

Here’s a new (and very laughable) phone scam from India.

Having previously suffered from (i) promises to refund from the UK Ministry of Justice £300 of bank charges illegally charged, processed via India for a processing fee (despite the fact I have never been charged any such charges); and (ii) the gentleman from “Microsoft” in India, working with my ISP, to defeat the computer viruses that have infected my computer (I played along and told them that, my ISP was “Oracle” so 30 seconds later he was claiming he was from Oracle and Microsoft), today as a reward for being a responsible citizen and maintaining a good credit record, the UK Ministry of Justice has authorised a payment of £2000 to be made to me by cheque.

In order to release this reward I needed to pay the tax on it, which was to be processed via New Delhi. Normally the government tax on £2000 would be £50, but today only, it would be £25 (such a bargain!!). Having been passed to a “supervisor” I was told I needed to wire this money via Western Union to Hitesh Walia in New Delhi, and the cheque would be with me from India within 3 hours of doing this (no, really). Asked how soon I could get to a Western Union I said about 20 mins (not really!!), and Mr. Scamster promised to phone back in 30 minutes once I had received the 10 digit transmission code receipt from Western Union.

30 minutes later I explained that Western Union would not process the payment without either a phone number or address as there was more than one Hitesh Walia in New Delhi. Mr Scamster refused to give a phone number as they were “not set up to receive incoming calls”, but did give me the address of 64 GB Road, New Delhi 110020, India (whether this is a true address or not, I do not know).

Tomorrow we will no doubt continue our amusing phone conversation, but this afternoon I passed all the details to my local police and will pass on any further info I get tomorrow.

Hitesh Walia = Indian £2000 phone scam

By ISC23 on 9 Jul 2010

New Indian phone scam

Here’s a new (and very laughable) phone scam from India.

Having previously suffered from (i) promises to refund from the UK Ministry of Justice £300 of bank charges illegally charged, processed via India for a processing fee (despite the fact I have never been charged any such charges); and (ii) the gentleman from “Microsoft” in India, working with my ISP, to defeat the computer viruses that have infected my computer (I played along and told them that, my ISP was “Oracle” so 30 seconds later he was claiming he was from Oracle and Microsoft), today as a reward for being a responsible citizen and maintaining a good credit record, the UK Ministry of Justice has authorised a payment of £2000 to be made to me by cheque.

In order to release this reward I needed to pay the tax on it, which was to be processed via New Delhi. Normally the government tax on £2000 would be £50, but today only, it would be £25 (such a bargain!!). Having been passed to a “supervisor” I was told I needed to wire this money via Western Union to Hitesh Walia in New Delhi, and the cheque would be with me from India within 3 hours of doing this (no, really). Asked how soon I could get to a Western Union I said about 20 mins (not really!!), and Mr. Scamster promised to phone back in 30 minutes once I had received the 10 digit transmission code receipt from Western Union.

30 minutes later I explained that Western Union would not process the payment without either a phone number or address as there was more than one Hitesh Walia in New Delhi. Mr Scamster refused to give a phone number as they were “not set up to receive incoming calls”, but did give me the address of 64 GB Road, New Delhi 110020, India (whether this is a true address or not, I do not know).

Tomorrow we will no doubt continue our amusing phone conversation, but this afternoon I passed all the details to my local police and will pass on any further info I get tomorrow.

Hitesh Walia = Indian £2000 phone scam

By ISC23 on 9 Jul 2010

New Indian phone scam

Here’s a new (and very laughable) phone scam from India.

Having previously suffered from (i) promises to refund from the UK Ministry of Justice £300 of bank charges illegally charged, processed via India for a processing fee (despite the fact I have never been charged any such charges); and (ii) the gentleman from “Microsoft” in India, working with my ISP, to defeat the computer viruses that have infected my computer (I played along and told them that, my ISP was “Oracle” so 30 seconds later he was claiming he was from Oracle and Microsoft), today as a reward for being a responsible citizen and maintaining a good credit record, the UK Ministry of Justice has authorised a payment of £2000 to be made to me by cheque.

In order to release this reward I needed to pay the tax on it, which was to be processed via New Delhi. Normally the government tax on £2000 would be £50, but today only, it would be £25 (such a bargain!!). Having been passed to a “supervisor” I was told I needed to wire this money via Western Union to Hitesh Walia in New Delhi, and the cheque would be with me from India within 3 hours of doing this (no, really). Asked how soon I could get to a Western Union I said about 20 mins (not really!!), and Mr. Scamster promised to phone back in 30 minutes once I had received the 10 digit transmission code receipt from Western Union.

30 minutes later I explained that Western Union would not process the payment without either a phone number or address as there was more than one Hitesh Walia in New Delhi. Mr Scamster refused to give a phone number as they were “not set up to receive incoming calls”, but did give me the address of 64 GB Road, New Delhi 110020, India (whether this is a true address or not, I do not know).

Tomorrow we will no doubt continue our amusing phone conversation, but this afternoon I passed all the details to my local police and will pass on any further info I get tomorrow.

Hitesh Walia = Indian £2000 phone scam

By ISC23 on 9 Jul 2010

New Indian phone scam

Here’s a new (and very laughable) phone scam from India.

Having previously suffered from (i) promises to refund from the UK Ministry of Justice £300 of bank charges illegally charged, processed via India for a processing fee (despite the fact I have never been charged any such charges); and (ii) the gentleman from “Microsoft” in India, working with my ISP, to defeat the computer viruses that have infected my computer (I played along and told them that, my ISP was “Oracle” so 30 seconds later he was claiming he was from Oracle and Microsoft), today as a reward for being a responsible citizen and maintaining a good credit record, the UK Ministry of Justice has authorised a payment of £2000 to be made to me by cheque.

In order to release this reward I needed to pay the tax on it, which was to be processed via New Delhi. Normally the government tax on £2000 would be £50, but today only, it would be £25 (such a bargain!!). Having been passed to a “supervisor” I was told I needed to wire this money via Western Union to Hitesh Walia in New Delhi, and the cheque would be with me from India within 3 hours of doing this (no, really). Asked how soon I could get to a Western Union I said about 20 mins (not really!!), and Mr. Scamster promised to phone back in 30 minutes once I had received the 10 digit transmission code receipt from Western Union.

30 minutes later I explained that Western Union would not process the payment without either a phone number or address as there was more than one Hitesh Walia in New Delhi. Mr Scamster refused to give a phone number as they were “not set up to receive incoming calls”, but did give me the address of 64 GB Road, New Delhi 110020, India (whether this is a true address or not, I do not know).

Tomorrow we will no doubt continue our amusing phone conversation, but this afternoon I passed all the details to my local police and will pass on any further info I get tomorrow.

Hitesh Walia = Indian £2000 phone scam

By ISC23 on 10 Jul 2010

The scam mentioned in this article happened this evening to my father. Again, he has only just bought a laptop and signed up with an ISP (BT) within the last week. I think this is more than a coincidence.

By craven5 on 6 Aug 2010

I've had a few of these phone calls this year.
The most recent was very suspicious as to how they possibly target.
I had a telephone call from my ISP from India, wanting me to upgrade to a more expensive package. I told them not only would I not pay any extra, I was thinking of switching provider due to an unsatisfactory (read almost non existent) internet connection at peak times.
Lo and behold next day, I had a phone call from India from 'PC Health online' or something similar. They said they'd had a call from my ISP about computer problems - part of the spchiel, but they knew who my ISP was.
Coincidence, hmm?
Anyway when they realised I knew they were a scam they hung up promptly. Caller number withheld.

BTW. ISC23 I googled 64 GB Road, New Delhi to see if it exists. Most amusing, it's a brothel!

By andypaciorek on 19 Feb 2011

RJ PC SUPPORT SCAM

I recently got a call from someone called Mark from rj pc support and they said that my computer is infected with viruses and malware. I immediately hang up and called my computer technician who visited my place and said my computer is absolutely fine.. this chap Mark said he is a Microsoft employee too which i highly doubt. he was asking me to download something which my antivirus detected as virus..

I would like to ask microsoft to look into this

By AWhite27 on 14 Apr 2011

It is still happening

Friday 26 August2011 8PM new my name and ISP told them I did not have a windows PC but a Linux box... Surprise surprise they hung up... ISP BT suspect call centre staff due to background noise and some other names given in backgrooound as answering calls.

By graybe on 28 Aug 2011

NERDI - SCAMMERS

Got a cold call from 'John Smith' (nice Indian Name considering the thickness of his Indian accent combined with the a tang of call centre trained American), calling from the London (yeah, right) offices of NERDI. He advised me that he is a registered Microsoft Technician and that they have had confirmation of over 3000 virus/errors on my PC. Now, I know this is a scam, no one cold calls you to offer assistance with you 'Problem' PC, so I tagged along. What i need to do is turn on my computer, open the windows start menu (which he explained to me like a 4 year old child, i got annoyed at this point and told him to get on with it as I know my way around a PC and windows) and to open the 'RUN' function (alarm bells should now be ringing), then to enter the acronym for brining up the event viewer, something like 'eventvwr'. Now I know perfectly well what this is, does and contains, so again i played along. He the proceeded to ask me to confirm some of the 'Errors' I was getting, I did, ' Oh on, you have a number of system errors caused by Trojan virus's' which apparently my world class virus software cant remove because it doesn't know it exists, and for a small fee (£50) and allowing him access to control my PC remotely he would rid my PC of all the infected files and errors. Whilst this was going on I was actually Googling his company name 'NERDI' and for event viewer phishing scams, low and behold, i may not be able to find any trace of a company called NERDI but this scam has been running for years, previously in Australia. I asked John what country he was calling from (so that I could suitably insult him before I hung up on him) and the kicker, 'Im based in London'. Well suffice to say that I told him to move away swiftly and procreate with his mothers ass (or something towards that fashion) and hung up on him. Can you believe he called straight back to ask why i had insulted him and that he certainly was not running a scam to either get access to my PCs files or my bank/card details. I offered the same statement about his mum and hung up. Thankfully no further calls have come through.
Be warned, this scam appears to be alive and well and now operating with UK telephone numbers. Do not give them your details. Do not pay for their service. this is a phishing scam that has obviously been sold onto someone new using an Indian based call unit or office.
And finally. Microsoft will not cold call you for any reason what so ever.
The only reason you would receive a call from Microsoft, especially for IT related issues, is because you have requested them to call you through one of their service/maintenance channels.
If you haven’t called them first, they are not from Microsoft.

By Scrittipollitti on 28 Oct 2011

I received a phone midday from an american accent girl by the name of KLirsty telling meshe is calling from Micro PC TechSupport,and telling me my PC has been identified having problem and so on and so forth,I simply just let her to finish her sales pitch, after she had finished I started from the begining and asking what is her anme and which company she is calling from and all the details one by one.I then asked her for her company phone number and she gave me aLondon number I said to her i will verify and she call back,I knew it was ascam,so i just forgot about but she did not,right after 1 hour she phoned again and i was driving and again i asked her yto phone back.After 2nd call i tried the number and it was someones home number.She called again and i said to her that number is not there number have they got a webadress,she gave the web address.again asked her to call later.On 4th call it was a guy i could not pin point accent but not a UK accent anyway,By this i had lost my patience and simply told them I dont ahve a PC and what the **** they are talking about just in split second she came on the phone So I am asuming this guy was getting training for the calls and she satrted swaering aswell I told she is a scamer and not phone again and ended my call.Not heared from them Yet.

By shamone1 on 3 May 2012

It's still going...

My parents have been receiving calls from Indian-sounding callers (number withheld) for a while now, up to 6 per day, informing us of "2000 errors" on our computer.
My dad and I are relatively computer literate, although not qualified, and we take great amusement in playing along. I have found that talking very slowly over the top of them asking for them to explain how my computer became infected when my dad has up to date protective software installed and how these viruses will affect me - often ends in the caller promising to come around to the house and infect the computer himself!

Today, when I asked for their address, the girl, once I had got her to slow her speech to an understandable level, provided "online pc export . com" I have put this through a search engine and didn't find anything...

Can't believe this is still going on. Can't paypal do something? (I believe a few people who have been scammed had to pay through this method)

Next time they phone, I will try to get their postal address and phone number and will post back.

P.S. Any advice on what questions I can ask to wind them up greatly appreciated ;-)

By bianchigirl on 18 Jun 2012

Again Already

I have just received our second call of the day, turns out I had the wrong company name (lost in translation I think) it is Online PC EXPERT not export as I previously thought.
The caller gave me his company address as:
14 Hanover Street, London and phone number of: 0203 2860502. He refused to give me the companies registered number with Companies House.

On checking this information, I find there is no company at that address with any links to computers, googling the phone number, surprisingly, brings up NERDI?? Who'd've thought it!

Cherry on the cake - I explained the reason I was being cautious is because I am aware of a number of scams relating to computers, the caller sympathised with me and told me "we are aware there are scams...it's been affecting our business.." what a joke!

They asked when they can call back to speak to my Dad, who I said is the only person who uses the computer, and I gave them a specific time for tomorrow...will see if they can wiat that long to try and scam us again!!

By bianchigirl on 18 Jun 2012

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