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Why Microsoft killed the Windows Start button

Windows 7 Start orb

By Barry Collins in Amsterdam

Posted on 28 Jun 2012 at 09:00

Microsoft claims it took the controversial decision to remove the Start button from the traditional Windows desktop because people had stopped using it.

The lack of a Start button on the Windows 8 desktop has been one of the most divisive elements of the new user interface. It had been widely assumed that Microsoft removed the Start button to force people to familiarise themselves with the new Metro Start screen, which is the centrepiece of the Windows 8 overhaul. However, speaking to PC Pro at TechEd in Amsterdam, a senior Microsoft executive told us that the old Start menu had already fallen out of favour with users of Windows 7.

"We’d seen the trend in Windows 7," said Chaitanya Sareen, principal program manager at Microsoft, referring to the telemetry gathered by the Microsoft Customer Experience Improvement Program. "When we evolved the taskbar we saw awesome adoption of pinning [applications] on the taskbar. We are seeing people pin like crazy. And so we saw the Start menu usage dramatically dropping, and that gave us an option. We’re saying 'look, Start menu usage is dropping, what can we do about it? What can we do with the Start menu to revive it, to give it some new identity, give it some new power?'"

"So I’m a desktop user, I pin the browser, Explorer, whatever my apps are. I don’t go the Start menu as often. If you’re going to the Start screen now, we’re going to unlock a whole new set of scenarios, or you can choose not to go there, stay in the desktop, and it’s still fast. You can’t beat the taskbar."

Sareen also claims that people are taking advantage of keyboard shortcuts to open applications, instead of resorting to the Start menu. "Press the Windows key and 1 and you’re already in IE [if IE is the first item pinned to your taskbar]. It’s so fast."

Metro for desktops

Sareen was also quick to dismiss criticism that the Metro interface is better suited to touchscreen devices than laptops and desktops.

Demonstrations during the day had seen two Microsoft presenters struggle to make gesture controls work on laptop trackpads, with the Start screen intermittently failing to scroll when the presenters swiped two fingers across the trackpad, for instance. Sareen insisted that the touchpad drivers were still "very, very early" and were "still being refined".

He also claimed that the Metro interface "really works well with the mouse and keyboard", highlighting features such as the option to search for applications simply by starting to type its name on the Metro Start screen.

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User comments

Crazy

I pin my regular applications in W7, yes, but what about the occasionals? I don't want a desktop cluttered with shortcuts: that's inefficient and uses memory. So, no, I'm sorry, the start button is still very useful to me.

By davefaulkner on 28 Jun 2012

Cods Wallop

As per usual (with Win8), Microsoft seem to be completely ignoring Power / professional users. Do I really want to pin the 100+ applications I have installed, or is it far easier and quicker for me to use the start menu for anything that isn't shortcutted on my desktop? And yes, I have got Win 8 installed in a virtual pc, and after the initial "having a play" look at Metro I haven't been near it since.... of no use to me at all!

By mrmiley on 28 Jun 2012

Sounds dumb...

I like the Windows 7 interface - and the start button. And I agree with davefaulkner - I do NOT want lots of clutter on my desktop - or large garish icons. Not that I've actually experienced W8. It's not sounding good though...

By halian on 28 Jun 2012

Whatever Mr Sareen's been drinking...

...can I get a bottle of it please?

http://i46.tinypic.com/rhtvnm.png

By Jaffo on 28 Jun 2012

DUH

There just is not enough space to pin all of my programs on the start bat, unless I expand it to 4 or 5 times width, then what is the point. I have the 10 most commonly used programs at the bottom of the screen, then about another 10 as icons at the top for useful utilities, 5 folders on the left. every thing else is via the start button.

By roberttrebor on 28 Jun 2012

Flawed, like most surveys

"We’d seen the trend in Windows 7," referring to the telemetry gathered by the Microsoft Customer Experience Improvement Program. "
Well there we have it, all but the most basic users opt out of the intrusive MCEIP - so they are surveying people who don't even know what the Start Button is for - I kid you not as a computer tech I see it all the time.

By cromel on 28 Jun 2012

Morons

They get in a sample of 'basic, NON power users' and see how they behave and presume that is ALL users.
If its something so little used why not make it optional like all the other config options for the task bar? I dont pin all my apps - if I did I'd have no task bar left!! I pin the 3 most commonly used ones and the rest go into my Start Menu or TrueLaunchBar little 'quick launch' I have configured with folders.
Lets see how many users lose track of programs they have installed now there is no central place you can always go to see what programs you have!

By nniillaa on 28 Jun 2012

Getting the wrong impressions from their statistics

"When we evolved the taskbar we saw awesome adoption of pinning [applications] on the taskbar"

Yes because no-one wants to use the bloody Metro interface and there is no other way. It's not that people want to, it's that they HAVE too! Microsoft answer seems to be to pin everyone of the 50 or so programs from your start mmenu to the taskbar. Great idea idiots.

By JStairmand on 28 Jun 2012

I must be in a permanent dream.

I only have a small number of things pinned to my (Windows 7) taskbar. The majority of my applications are either accessed via the Start Button, or Desktop icon when the Desktop is visible.

Sorry Mr Sareen, I've tried Windows 8 on a sacrificial PC and found even the simplest everyday tasks had some extra time consuming 'Faff' added to them. For me, removing the Start Button and insisting on the Metro Start Screen adds considerably to this.

By stevenwarr on 28 Jun 2012

I haven't actually tried the new interface. But isn't this very similar to how OSX works? You have a bar of shortcuts to the most used programs then spotlight (cmd-space) allows a quick search to get the rest. It took me a while to adjust from the windows way but I'm very comfortable with it now. PS. I'm not a fanboy just noting a similarity.

By magicmonkey3 on 28 Jun 2012

Word

"Why Microsoft killed the Windows Start button"

...We have a whole load of computers here and I can honestly state that none of them use the Start button other than to shut down or log off. Once you place the MS Office shortcuts onto the task bar it's simply log in and go.

How do I know this? If a shortcut is removed I'll immediately get a phone call asking how to open Excel or Word. Yep...

Oh well the people that like to repeat 'Windows 8 will fail because it's not a desktop OS' will keep on repeating the same tired things. Win 8 on the desktop... perfectly fine

By rhythm on 28 Jun 2012

P.s.

It seems to me from the comments above that the amount of time spent using Windows 8 is quite limited.

You can still have your top ten applications as Metro tiles and simply type the name of any other application that you need. Quick? Quicker than clicking Start, All programs, progam x folder, program.

Funny that

By rhythm on 28 Jun 2012

The real reason ...

... for secure boot to W8 only, for absorbing Flash but banning all other extensibilty possibilities, for all the ARM configuration restrictions, for the enforced METROfication of the UI, for the recently announced MSFT tablet ...

... is that MSFT wants to copy Apple, AMAZON and Google and move to its own walled garden before the company is swallowed up by its faster-moving competitors.

Asking The Pope why he prefers Catholicism is of course a futile question.

By Jacko55 on 28 Jun 2012

Read the first paragraph or two and my eyes glazed over. He's talking through his hole.

By deejerox on 28 Jun 2012

Half right

I pin my most used apps, about a dozen. That covers around 95% of my usage. For the remaining 50 or shortcuts in my start menu, which I use very occassionally, I usually press the Windows key and type in the first couple of letters.

I have 1 icon on my desktop, the trashcan and that is because I haven't gotten around to hiding it yet.

That said, the Metro startscreen popping up when I press the windows key is a little frustrating, especially if I want to start searching for something whilst using a web page as a reference...

By big_D on 28 Jun 2012

Wrong

I have always used the start menu and only pin essential apps on the taskbar.

By scottbob9 on 28 Jun 2012

It won't be missed!

I pretty much can't stand the start button in Windows 7 and almost never use it, I think the idea's fine but it's been poorly implemented. My biggest gripe is probably caused by 3rd party software developers rather than Microsoft, the issue is that the "all programs" constantly fills up with junk, no matter how many times you try and organise it the damn thing quickly becomes a cluttered mess with duplicate icons all over the place after application updates, this could easily be sorted by creating a windows API to manager the start button's contents. My second issue is with search, you type in your search string, wait a year then open the suspected file to find out it's not the correct document, you go back and the search has vanished and needs retyping, very frustrating. In the end I've had to resort to using simple 3rd party launchers such as "portable start menu" to keep my application list organised, and Google Desktop search to perform the document searches, 2 things that Windows 7 surely should have perfected.

By Samo42 on 28 Jun 2012

Missing the point...

@rhythm
I agree, if you only have a very few applications installed, pinning them is by far a better way of working. The company where I am IT manager we use far more than just word and excel, and everyone uses the start button regularly.
I'm not sure about hitting the start button and typing to start an app? Never ever done this in my life, didn't even know you could! Not for me, as it would mean taking my hand off the mouse... I use the mouse for virtually everything I do (except typing in word, very occasionally) cause most of my work is in graphics software of one sort or another, where I can work all day and only use the keyboard for the odd shortcut (ctrl C & ctrl V mainly) but that's just me :D

By mrmiley on 28 Jun 2012

Start button

I do not know in what world Chaitanya Sareen lives. I think she has a self fulfilling fantasy and needs to get real. I use of course the pinning option, with moderation I may add, but I am using the start butoon all the time if I want to go to the Control Panel, the registry, MS config system, etc. I think MS is once again shooting themselve into the foot. I will not use OS 8 if they keep going on like that. OS 7 is fantastic, OS 8 is crap.

By gerko on 28 Jun 2012

Along with others here I just keep the bare 'often used' shortcuts on the task bar , along with minimul short cut icons on the desktop.The less used programs are confined to access behind the Start button. Now if they want to put a Program Vault icon in Metro, a bit like the system used in Android , then fine.Otherwise , leave well alone.

By Jaberwocky on 28 Jun 2012

I am tired of MS's lack of understanding

After so many years I would have thought that MS would understand the cost of their stupid changes to businesses. As a supplier to small businesses I cannot recommend WIN8 as it requires users to loose all/most of the skills that they have developed over the years. Think again. Ribbons cost my customers a fortune, Win 8 is likely to cost them even more!!

By absthame on 28 Jun 2012

I love the Start Button!!

I always use the Start button and think its better in Win7 than ever before. I like keeping my desktop empty to show off my wallpapers, so I've customised the Start menu to have my most used software. I have to click on the Start button everytime I want to close down my PC anyway.

Thats how I prefer it, that makes my life easier, and theres no way Microsoft is telling me to do it their way just so they can make a new OS for their tablets and phone.

Think I'll be sticking to Win7 being as Win8 sucks big-time!

By KlingonBatleth on 28 Jun 2012

Oh dear.....

You might have thought that Microsoft would have learned from the days of Vista that not listening to your wider customer base (as opposed to a small sample) is a bad idea. It seems that there are some very over-optimistic people working on Windows 8 with very short memories!

By mystic_dan on 28 Jun 2012

Awesome

Anyone that uses "awesome" in the context of “awesome adoption of pinning” instantly lacks credibility.

Witnessing Mount Vesuvius erupt over Pompeii would have been awesome but witnessing a user pinning a surprisingly high number of items to the Task Bar would never move me beyond “that’s interesting”.

By SparkyHD on 28 Jun 2012

They've done with the START button what they did with HELP...

Windows help used to be context sensitive, indexed and searchable using keywords. Microsoft then introduced the "improved" HTML help, which was basically a non-contextual, keyword free botch-up. Indexing on every word. Genius. It's like taking a phone directory, tearing out all the pages and throwing them on the floor in no particular order. It's that helpful.

Removing the START bar might be fine for very basic users, but if you ALREADY KNOW where your programs reside and you use more than two applications, an ordered tree of programs is fast and functional, unlike a search which requires MOUSE and KEYBOARD input and is slow and counter-productive.

Microsoft need to survey a bit further than a room full of in-house yes-men.

By cheysuli on 28 Jun 2012

Ctjimmyheyrseshelpers

This is the main reason I don't buy new Windows products. I would venture to guess that 95% of the people who use Windows still only use the basic features of the first windows XP. Every new version of Windows does the exact same thing, they take everything that you've learned to use and just move it around to a different position. You spend way too much time trying to find out where they put the command that you learned in the last version. And then you have to pay $150 on top of that. If all the new computers had Windows XP drivers available I think that 75% of the people would still have Windows XP

By Ctjimmy on 28 Jun 2012

But even going by their example, Start is still better.

With the current start menu I just go start>search, with W8 I have to go to metro to do the exact same thing.

By tech3475 on 28 Jun 2012

MCEIP is a joke

Basing this on the MCEIP feedback is a joke. The majority of users I know opt out based on privacy concerns because they don't want M$ following their every move. 8 is going to be the new Vista or the new ME simply because M$ doesn't want to listen to their customers. Let me rephrase that, they only want to listen to the customers that don't mind them eavesdropping on them.

By SCJ01 on 28 Jun 2012

Summed up in two YouTube videos

This sums up Microsoft
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QZ1oPDtdhFo

And this sums up the "Windows 8 experience"
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hxmIsv88xO4

By cheysuli on 28 Jun 2012

Loss of the Start Menu isn't what worries me...

I am someone who uses the Start Menu, but its Metro replacement is usable enough once you get used to it. It's also a pretty easy thing to add back with a 3rd party tweak.

What worries me is how Microsoft are pushing Metro for the desktop. They've consistently made it clear that they don't just see it as an interface for little touchscreen tablets. They may be supporting the desktop now, but I'm convinced that they see Metro as the future of Windows.

I can see Microsoft making future applications Metro only to push people into using it. Starting with things like document viewers, media players and utilities, but eventually shifting everything to Metro.

How long until the desktop becomes a barely supported legacy component?

By davek99 on 28 Jun 2012

Anyone else tired of the rudeness?

Why do so many feel the need to make personal, derogatory comments to get their point across? Am really tired of the lack of some peoples ability to have a civilised discourse (especially the so-called "professionals").

For my part, I never use the start button except to begin the process of typing the application I want. Want to launch notepad? Windows key, "n", enter (notepad is often top of search for me). Using a mouse to click start/accessories/notepad - are you kidding me? How many of the "power users" really click to get to some of the settings buried in Control Panel?

I do not think it is about replacing the start button because everyone uses the task bar instead. It has simply become redundant in the context of both the pinning features and the brilliant ability to search.

As a software consultant, we are reminded (especially by power users) that UI's should not continually require users to move their hands from the keyboard to mouse unless necessary. The cascading menus under the start button is the epiphany of what we are forever being asked NOT to deliver.

Now await the vitriol...

By jefferson30 on 28 Jun 2012

Loss of the Start Menu isn't what worries me...

I am someone who uses the Start Menu, but its Metro replacement is usable enough once you get used to it. It's also a pretty easy thing to add back with a 3rd party tweak.

What worries me is how Microsoft are pushing Metro for the desktop. They've consistently made it clear that they don't just see it as an interface for little touchscreen tablets. They may be supporting the desktop now, but I'm convinced that they see Metro as the future of Windows.

I can see Microsoft making future applications Metro only to push people into using it. Starting with things like document viewers, media players and utilities, but eventually shifting everything to Metro.

How long until the desktop becomes a barely supported legacy component?

By davek99 on 28 Jun 2012

Better for power users?

Being an OS X user at home, I 'pin' all my most used apps to my Dock.

At work I use Win XP, and have about 12 of my most used apps in the Quick Launch bar (task bar is double height)).

In OS X, if I want to launch another app that isn't on my Dock, I just hit command+space and type in part of the name. If I can't find it I can go to my Applications folder or launch Launchpad.

In Win XP if I want to launch another app that isn't in my Quick Launch bar, I've got to go into the Start Menu and find it amongst all other programs in there, presuming it's been installed to appear there in the first place!

Win7 improves things by allowing you to pin apps to the task bar and having search enabled as soon as you hit Start.

I haven't used Win8, and probably won't until I work for someone who gives me a machine with it on, but as long as it provides a search facility that allows you to launch apps, I really think power users will be fine. And non-power users will just pin everything!

By forquare1 on 28 Jun 2012

I Really Want To Keep My Start Button

I would Be somewhat lost without Both Start Button & Menu!!!

Pinning to Task-bar is Much Overrated,Whenever I've used It, It Has caused My 6month-old HP Pavilion g7's Fan to go into A VERY NOISY State of what can only be described as "OVER-DRIVE"

By JoFrances on 28 Jun 2012

Lies

I use the start button all the time. They want to remove it to take away usefulness just like they wanted to remove the command prompt. Epic fail

By blahful on 28 Jun 2012

Lies

I use the start button all the time. They want to remove it to take away usefulness just like they wanted to remove the command prompt. Epic fail

By blahful on 28 Jun 2012

Long live Windows 7 and the Start Button, down with Windows 8 and Metro

By rickman2k on 28 Jun 2012

And what if.......

You are not sure of what the program or application is called? Typing won't help you and for me the Metro style is visually clumsy.

By engelkott on 28 Jun 2012

Bug /= Feature

"I am someone who uses the Start Menu, ...It's also a pretty easy thing to add back with a 3rd party tweak."

This makes the removal of the Start Button a BUG, not a FEATURE.

You shouldn't need to hunt for third-party tweaks to be productive.

By Slave2Machine on 28 Jun 2012

Bug /= Feature

"I am someone who uses the Start Menu, ...It's also a pretty easy thing to add back with a 3rd party tweak."

This makes the removal of the Start Button a BUG, not a FEATURE.

You shouldn't need to hunt for third-party tweaks to be productive.

By Slave2Machine on 28 Jun 2012

Bug /= Feature

"I am someone who uses the Start Menu, ...It's also a pretty easy thing to add back with a 3rd party tweak."

This makes the removal of the Start Button a BUG, not a FEATURE.

You shouldn't need to hunt for third-party tweaks to be productive.

By Slave2Machine on 28 Jun 2012

Just learn Win8 tips

Mouse activities with start menu: Accessing programs that are not pinned: a) for most people, these take up small amount of usage. In Win 7: click on start menu, click on all programs, scroll through the list to find the folder often it is the developers name, click on folder, click on application you want. Win8: Mouse to popup, click it, use scroll wheel to go to particular collection of apps (each collection is a separate grid), click on the app you want.
Power user features: Win 7: click on start menu, then either click on some items like control panel or right-click some like computer or go to run and type in something. In Win8: go to start-popup, right-click on it, all the main power user items are there in one easy to access list.

Keyboard: Win7: type windows key, type something, slow search, go through the assortment of files, settings, applications to find what you want. Win8: hit winkey, type what you want, select it or change filter to files or settings or search within any metro app. Win7: some power user features: go to start, then run then type. Win8: just hit winkey and type. Also access power user menu through Win+X, access charms through Win+C, access Win+I to go straight to settings like shutdown.

In Win7, how easy is it to access the different shut down options (e.g. restart, hibernate etc) without using a mouse? In Win8, it barely takes any time at all, but how often you need to use the command anyway? On tablets and laptops it's much less necessary (hit power button to turn off screen on tablet or just close laptop lid).

By TheBigM72 on 28 Jun 2012

Have not used the start menu for many many years. Why? I use TrueLaunch, so I've been pinning/ docking stuff to the taskbar for years. The Windows Taskbar is also Docked to the top of the screen where it shoulb be, where the mouse spends 80% of its time anyway.

By NJKA001 on 28 Jun 2012

Quicker way to start a program

I am using Windows 8 RC. To find and start a program in the Metro screen just type the first few letters of required program. A short list or single program will appear on the left screen and press enter to select. eg wor for word or ex for excel. Much quicker than start button. I am happy about its demise.

By treefern on 28 Jun 2012

Audit

The start button is a useful way to have a quick scrolling audit of what's available, what you want to get rid of etc.

By Roger_Andre on 29 Jun 2012

No START Button?

I hope this statement does not distract from the article.

I had got used to closing down my computer by switching off the Computer Power Button. It would complain at times that ???? and the screen would briefly flicker a message, before power down.

As it happen, I looked through the administrative parts of the operating system and found many many warnings about the shut down sequence.

I also discovered that modern Hard Drives record just about every on of up down and power swing in their SMART Tables. If problems are seen that the drive just MIGHT be going defective, the SMART Flag is set and one is advised to get a new drive. Unfortunately this can not be reset by a user, even if it was false positives.

Therefore I recommend using the Start / Switch off via the mouse and O.S. and NOT the Power Button.

By lenmontieth on 30 Jun 2012

Don't let their claims fool you.

They have nothing to do with reality. Ms makes a decision, then creates a "reason", pulling figures out of the air. They are totally made up. This is just another rather obvious example. They seem to believe that we are all complete idiots.

By Rickkins on 30 Jun 2012

Start Button

"the old Start menu had already fallen out of favour with users of Windows 7"

In my opinion the downward trend in using the start button was due to the stupid design which MS started in Vista, by putting a scroll bar on the all programs menu. I found this to be really painful to use coming from XP, and you had no control over customising the layout of it, say if you wanted program folders to appear at the top rather than at the bottom.

The majority of apps that I use are now either on the desktop, taskbar or pinned to the start menu, which is not by choice.

As for Metro, an unattractive desktop UI, doesn't appeal to businesses or Power users. MS are just steam rolling whatever they want because they have little competition in certain markets, however I don't see a lot of people upgrading to Windows 8.

By Crichton on 1 Jul 2012

No Start Button- Major Mistake

In the Users world the Start Button is the gateway to the guts of User Control.
To do away with it is crazy and will increase the Anti Microsoft Legions for trying to Control Behaviour. Desktop & Laptop User.

By Bushbug on 1 Jul 2012

Why we built ActiveWords..

This article spells our exactly why we built ActiveWords, e.g., http://www.activewords.com/
The ability to type a letter/acronym to launch an app in a context free status is vastly more powerful than having to pin something to the task bar, or go to the start menu. Every time you take your hands off the keyboard you are wasting time.

I hope the commenters on this try ActiveWords, we have customers all over the UK.

Buzz

By Buzzmodo on 2 Jul 2012

2 + 2 = 0

I used to drive 20k miles a year. Nowadays I typically only cover 4-5k per annum. Would MS conclude that I have no longer have a need for a car?

By tdodd1 on 5 Jul 2012

(ActiveWords) Publishers description

ActiveWords is user interface technology that makes all words active. Enter or select any text in any context at any time, and be directly transported to services related to the meaning of that text. (WHAT DO YOU THINK THE START BUTTON DOES?( Make a small investment in tagging all the things you do with words that mean something to you. (MORE TWEAKING )Then, trigger those words, your ActiveWords, to instantly get what you want. ActiveWords delivers instant access to your favorite Web sites, files, folders, and programs.,,,,,
Why in God's name would you want to add an application to your PC That already had the ability to access ALL apps with the click of a mouse button.
"we have customers all over the UK." But not the world i suspect, and i disagree with the underhand advertising of you company and/or products here.

By hanstrans3 on 5 Jul 2012

The Odds aren't good

Win95
ME
Vista
8 (?)
It could even apply to 1.0 and 3.0
I think I'll wait for the next iteration

By trgzbaby on 5 Jul 2012

The Odds aren't good

Win95
ME
Vista
8 (?)
It could even apply to 1.0 and 3.0
I think I'll wait for the next iteration

By trgzbaby on 5 Jul 2012

Full screen apps

Much of my work is software development and most applications I use are set to full screen. I therefore very rarely see my desktop. The Start button is always available. I have not been happy with the messy desktop that Windows 8 (beta) displays.

KEEP THE START BUTTON PLEASE.

By mscotgrove on 5 Jul 2012

Full screen apps

Much of my work is software development and most applications I use are set to full screen. I therefore very rarely see my desktop. The Start button is always available. I have not been happy with the messy desktop that Windows 8 (beta) displays.

KEEP THE START BUTTON PLEASE.

By mscotgrove on 5 Jul 2012

Going Backwards in Time

25 years ago if I needed to open an application I either remembered the name of it's executable and where it was or I did a search for it. That was using MS DOS.

So what's the difference between using MS DOS and Win 8 to open least-used apps? (For the benefit of the trolls that was said tongue in cheek).

Funny thing is, when I used MS DOS I bought a Menu program for it called 3DMenu which worked much like the Windows Start Menu.

By shrek59 on 5 Jul 2012

Going Backwards in Time

25 years ago if I needed to open an application I either remembered the name of it's executable and where it was or I did a search for it. That was using MS DOS.

So what's the difference between using MS DOS and Win 8 to open least-used apps? (For the benefit of the trolls that was said tongue in cheek).

Funny thing is, when I used MS DOS I bought a Menu program for it called 3DMenu which worked much like the Windows Start Menu.

By shrek59 on 5 Jul 2012

Going Backwards in Time

25 years ago if I needed to open an application I either remembered the name of it's executable and where it was or I did a search for it. That was using MS DOS.

So what's the difference between using MS DOS and Win 8 to open least-used apps? (For the benefit of the trolls that was said tongue in cheek).

Funny thing is, when I used MS DOS I bought a Menu program for it called 3DMenu which worked much like the Windows Start Menu.

By shrek59 on 5 Jul 2012

More Balmer and CFO inspired whims

8 is pretty much a Pig in Lipstick, churned out in their headless chicken race to emulate the iPad and iPhone.

The GUI team at Apple must need sedation to avert the health threatening belly laughs Microsoft's team invoke.

The strength of the PC has always been in its deep customisation, why else would tweakui be so popular?

Metro is fine, but a Blind Man on a Gallopping Horse could see that it should be a selectable mode, with standard desktop and start menu still available underneath.

This kind of mind fog is what cut IBM down and allowed Microsoft to grow way back when.

By Gindylow on 5 Jul 2012

Start button

I just don't believe the "telemetry data" is what they say it is. The start button is in use daily here. Yes I 'pin' the most used software and I also see a place for the Metro look - but not on my desktop thanks. If you want me to buy into Windows 8 Microsoft, I suggest you provide us with a choice

By goodron2244 on 11 Jul 2012

Start Button

What we have here are a couple of dozen comments stating that MS's telemetry data is simply inaccurate, but I'm here to tell you that I have 43 applications pinned to my taskbar and I find it to be the best way to find and open any app that I'm going to use. Anything that I can't pin to the taskbar I create a shortcut for on my desktop.

It's hard to believe that all of you "professionals" are still doing things the old way. I'm 59 years old and even I have adopted the fastest, easiest way to access all of the apps that I use.

Besides that, why would MS lie about such a thing? They know what we use and how we use it, and I have to tell you that most of you are obviously wrong and you need to get up to speed with what's going on out there in the "real world", quit complaining and stop accusing MS of telling lies.

By kkeicher on 14 Jul 2012

Start Button

What we have here are a couple of dozen comments stating that MS's telemetry data is simply inaccurate, but I'm here to tell you that I have 43 applications pinned to my taskbar and I find it to be the best way to find and open any app that I'm going to use. Anything that I can't pin to the taskbar I create a shortcut for on my desktop.

It's hard to believe that all of you "professionals" are still doing things the old way. I'm 59 years old and even I have adopted the fastest, easiest way to access all of the apps that I use.

Besides that, why would MS lie about such a thing? They know what we use and how we use it, and I have to tell you that most of you are obviously wrong and you need to get up to speed with what's going on out there in the "real world", quit complaining and stop accusing MS of telling lies.

By kkeicher on 14 Jul 2012

Start Button

What we have here are a couple of dozen comments stating that MS's telemetry data is simply inaccurate, but I'm here to tell you that I have 43 applications pinned to my taskbar and I find it to be the best way to find and open any app that I'm going to use. Anything that I can't pin to the taskbar I create a shortcut for on my desktop.

It's hard to believe that all of you "professionals" are still doing things the old way. I'm 59 years old and even I have adopted the fastest, easiest way to access all of the apps that I use.

Besides that, why would MS lie about such a thing? They know what we use and how we use it, and I have to tell you that most of you are obviously wrong and you need to get up to speed with what's going on out there in the "real world", quit complaining and stop accusing MS of telling lies.

By kkeicher on 14 Jul 2012

Start Button

What we have here are a couple of dozen comments stating that MS's telemetry data is simply inaccurate, but I'm here to tell you that I have 43 applications pinned to my taskbar and I find it to be the best way to find and open any app that I'm going to use. Anything that I can't pin to the taskbar I create a shortcut for on my desktop.

It's hard to believe that all of you "professionals" are still doing things the old way. I'm 59 years old and even I have adopted the fastest, easiest way to access all of the apps that I use.

Besides that, why would MS lie about such a thing? They know what we use and how we use it, and I have to tell you that most of you are obviously wrong and you need to get up to speed with what's going on out there in the "real world", quit complaining and stop accusing MS of telling lies.

By kkeicher on 14 Jul 2012

Win7 like XP!

I like to set W7 up like XP. I don't pin anything to the taskbar, and hate any application that keeps a taskbar button open when hidden, such as Windows Live Messenger for example, which I run in XP Compatibility mode so that it hides to a notification icon. Then I restore XP's Quick Launch bar which I use with a double-height taskbar to access my 16 most-used applications.

I still use the start button quite a lot since my hails from an old IBM RS/6000 and doesn't even have a Windows key. Big and clunky, but oh so good to type on.

Lastly, I use two monitors arranged side by side, and from my tests (admittedly in a VM) the new Windows 8 charms are hellishly tricky to activate if you can't hang your pointer in the inner corners of your primary display.

I have a feeling I'll have been scolded by PC Pro for still using Windows 7 in 2019...

By Sushifiend on 20 Jul 2012

Start Menu

Placing the Windows Explorer folder as the first item in my task bar, then pressing the windows key, get me - Hey Presto the START MENU.

Will this also work in Windows 8?

By roberttrebor on 28 Jul 2012

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