Skip to navigation
Latest News

Windows 7 still being sold on up to 93% of British PCs

Windows 8

By Mike Jennings

Posted on 19 Feb 2013 at 09:21

The vast majority of British-assembled PCs are being sold with Windows 7, not Windows 8, according to several system builders contacted by PC Pro.

One company told PC Pro it was still selling 93% of its machines with Windows 7 installed.

Paul Redford, chairman of Manchester-based Computer Planet, has sold more than 500 systems in January, with only 20% of them running Windows 8. It’s a far cry from the sales figures he expected after the release of the touch-friendly OS.

"When Windows 8 was first released, as per Microsoft’s requests, we sold our systems with Windows 8," said Redford, who thought it would "soon become the standard".

His customers quickly began to specify systems with Windows 7, and said Windows 8 customers "took delivery and wanted to change back to Windows 7" – a process Redford described as a "nightmare".

Redford changed the default installation from Windows 8 to Windows 7 and now offers both systems on all of his machines. Redford is also "considering offering an open source Start menu [for Windows 8] with an option to disable the Start screen" as a free option for his customers.

Further concerns

Redford's Computer Planet isn't the only British firm struggling with the launch of Windows 8. One company told us that of the 1,459 machines it's sold so far in 2013, only 7% have left the factory with Windows 8 installed. A spokesman said that "Windows 7 fulfils the requirements" of its customers, and that driver issues and the unfamiliarity of the new OS was putting people off.

Another system builder said that only 26% of systems sold since the release of Windows 8 have used the new OS, and a spokesman delivered a damning assessment of the software. "Customers struggle to find their way around," he said. "I've had a few people ask why Microsoft didn't include a tutorial. Some have problems with driver and peripheral compatibility, and others find that simple things no longer work because Microsoft has changed something ‘under the hood’."

The spokesman also told us he’s had "positive feedback about the general look of the desktop UI", but added "customers want these basic improvements in a Windows 7-style system. We know of people who have returned to Windows 7 – I don’t remember this with people upgrading from Windows XP."

Three other companies told us that Windows 7 was still being included with the majority of their machines, with up to 80% of systems still shipping with the older OS installed.

"Sales in 2013 are 65% in favour of Windows 7," said one, explaining that "initial reactions after launch were negative thanks to media reviews influencing consumers".

Two firms also spoke about a lack of support from Microsoft. "A 'Windows 7' mode would be hugely beneficial," said one. "But it's [Microsoft's] way or the highway."

Another said: "[Microsoft] has blamed system builders – but it's out of touch, and doesn't understand that our customers are savvy" with regards to the new OS.

Positive future?

Peter George, sales director of Wired2Fire, says that PC sales at his firm are split evenly between the two operating systems, although he puts that down to "including [Start menu tool] Classic Shell because the interface has been badly received by desktop users".

George hasn't seen a drop in sales because of Windows 8, and he reckons that customers simply need to get used to the OS. "Every OS launch we've been involved in has been received negatively, but that's the nature of something new. I believe the lion's share of customers are happy with Windows 8 once they've become used to the differences."

Another PC builder shared Wired2Fire’s optimism, telling us that "when customers take the time to use Windows 8 they love it, and wouldn't have anything else". However, the source added that "if Microsoft included a guide or walkthrough, customers would learn how to use Windows 8 to its maximum potential."

A Microsoft spokesman said: "Windows 8 has sold 60 million licences to date, and this represents the cumulative sales of Windows 8 including upgrades and sales to OEMs for new devices."

The spokesman added that Windows 8 is following "a similar sales trajectory" to Windows 7.

Subscribe to PC Pro magazine. We'll give you 3 issues for £1 plus a free gift - click here
User comments

PC World

There wasn't even 1 single machine in PC World without Windows 8.

These PC builders could always put together a standard build with the Libraries added to the Modern UI?!

By rhythm on 19 Feb 2013

I'm Amazed

I'm amazed at how people are struggling with this, but it is Microsoft's fault for not having a user manual which runs at first start up of the new OS.

I got used to W8 in one weekend and felt like I'd always used it after only 2 weeks. Would I go back to W7 now? No way!

No-one has ever mentioned anywhere that EVERYTHING you ever had on the Start Menu in Windows 7 can be "in your face" on the new W8 Start screen, making it more productive than the old Start menu. Meaning, even the things you had to get to by clicking All Programs, scrolling down and going into folders can be on the new Start screen and visible right away without any scrolling and going into folders, especially if you have a full HD upwards monitor. I've never seen anyone drag their day-to-day apps to the left of the Start screen.

The bottom line is - people are unimaginative and basically brain-dead.

Microsoft, or maybe PC vendors should provide a Desktop wallpaper shwing the most useful keyboard shortcuts. A user would then only have to look at the desktop to know what to do.

By cooloox on 19 Feb 2013

@cooloox

You said "people are unimaginative and basically brain-dead. "

I think MS must agree with you and as with yourself adopted the attitude "If you are too brain dead to use this OS go use something else"

Its the opposite strategy of - "Ok lets make this OS really easy to use for the average user"

Personally I think the 2nd strategy is going to sell more products.

The first strategy will ensure Windows ends up a niche market for IT professionals only.

By cyberindie on 19 Feb 2013

No use for Windows 8

I've bought a number of new computers in the past few weeks, and specified them all with Windows 7. I manage a bit over a hundred computers, and up until now I've always gradually introduced new OSs - we even had some computers with Vista! I've currently standardised on Windows 7, and can see no reason at all to 'upgrade' to Windows 8 - many of the users will struggle with it and in terms of useful functionality it offers nothing over and above Windows 7. I'm intending to stick with 7 and see what the following Windows release is like. I imagine I'm not alone in this!

By valeofyork on 19 Feb 2013

@cyberindle

I agree with you totally!

They either need to make it a bit simpler, or give proper directions on how to use it as soon as you open it. Something that opens at Start up with the usual checkbox to stop it showing at start up (once you get used to it).

It is actually very simple to use, but it's VERY UNINTUITIVE before you know how it works.

By cooloox on 19 Feb 2013

I have both w7 and w8, w8 in my opinion is just not as productive if you have many active programs open at the same time and you need to see all of them, saying that my laptop which i use mainly for surfing has w8 and i quite like it, but for work , give me w7 everytime.

By stevenproc on 19 Feb 2013

@cooloox

Totally agree. I wouldn't go back to 7 now. But the vendors need to customize the start screen a bit so that all the most useful stuff is nicely organized there.

By jgwilliams on 19 Feb 2013

I could have said this 12 months ago! I knew most people would avoid Windows 8, not just because its different, but because Windows 7 meets their needs. For me, Win7 is perfect and it does everything I want it to do. Why should I spend money on anything else?

By KlingonBatleth on 19 Feb 2013

Simpler...

I upgraded my fiance's PC to Windows 8, because she used it on mine and found it less confusing than Windows 7.

She was a little confused with the Mail app, because she was used to logging out of Yahoo! after she had read her mail and couldn't find the logout button in Mail. Since then, she hasn't come to me with a single question, something that was a weekly occurrence with Windows 7.

Heck, she even managed to download some apps from the Windows Store. She still doesn't know how to install a non-App Store app.

By big_D on 19 Feb 2013

Not saying the small system builders should be ignored but to use a headline figure of 93% for such small companies and making it sound like this is indicative of the whole of the UK is pretty poor.

Unless you are getting figures from Dell, HP or Curry's/PC World the minuscule numbers above are just a drop in the ocean.

By Deano on 19 Feb 2013

@KlingonBatleth

You're right that people probably won't spend money to get it, but we are talking here about new computers that come with it for no extra cost.

Thinking about what cooloox said earlier, there's really only one shortcut key you need: the Windows key. That gets you in and out of the Start screen, which is really all you need.

By jgwilliams on 19 Feb 2013

Agree with Deano - this is a funny use of the words "up to" in a headline which gave me a false impression, corrected in the smaller print of paragraph 2.

I guess we live with a culture set by tech providers and "up to 20 meg broadband" meaning quite typically less than half of that...

By bern_leckie on 19 Feb 2013

Wow! unbelievable

I had the release candidate and thought the lack of Help & Support was just because it was pre-release.

Definitely not impressed if that's the case for RTM'd version too.

Epic fail!

By technogeist on 19 Feb 2013

I'm not brain dead

I just appreciate the most efficient way of doing things. To open a setting or file in Win 7:
- Press Start key,
- type first few characters,
- press return.

To open a setting or file in Win 8:
- Press Start key,
- type first few characters,
- key over to the files or settings section of metro
- press enter
- press enter again to open the file or setting.
Win7 > Win8.
Of course I could remember the two new keyboard shortcuts for doing a files or settings search, but why would I want to do that?

By brendan on 19 Feb 2013

It's a mystery to me...

I can't understand what all the vitriol is about myself.
I've switched into W8 100% and although there are usability glitches, it's perfectly OK for Work and Home.

The truth is that MS were going to have to shake-up the Windows O\S ecology sooner or later. They had to change and innovate but it was a case of damned if they do, damned if they don't!

The consequent almost universal criticism is both inevitable and rather tedious. Maintaining 100% backward compatibility and keeping users "comfortable" would completely stultify innovation and development. Apple made several of these radical transitions but were insulated by the 'Reality Distortion Field' effect of Mr Jobs.

The good news is that MS now has a modern O\S code-base that runs on both major current CPU families, and across multiple device types. It's painful in the short-term, maybe, but a decent foundation for the future.

By wittgenfrog on 20 Feb 2013

Sinofsky Killed The Silverlight

Windows 8 could have been a really nice swish 3D silverlight based environment but Steve Sinofsky killed that.

By Roger_Andre on 20 Feb 2013

Windows 8 is optimised for BYOD set ups, but lacking when it comes to application in the enterprise environment

Windows 8 has been optimised for tablet users as opposed to providing that slick finish we have come to expect on the enterprise side. As a traditionally strong player in the enterprise space, Microsoft has opted to emulate the Apple look-and-feel with this new release. While the Windows 8 core is based on Windows 7 – which as a result of sustained evolution is an excellent Operating System – it is a shame that, on the desktop, the new Metro facade and the removal of the Start menu eradicate years of familiarity synonymous with the Windows brand.

However, there are some key features of Windows 8 that will prove genuinely useful in the corporate environment – not just for the individual user, but also the IT team – such as a speedier booting process to replace BIOS, increased flexibility when it comes to managing virtual clients, and Microsoft’s Refresh and Reset function. These features are a step in the right direction towards better IT efficiency, but could have easily given immediate benefit to Windows 7 users as well – especially considering that organisations are typically slow to migrate to new Operating Systems.

By Sumir_Karayi_CEO_1E on 20 Feb 2013

Solution to I'm not brain dead

In windows 8:
1. Move cursor to top right corner then come down to search and click.
2. Start typing program name.
3. Press enter.

Same 3 steps. Although if you are after a setting you will need to click on settings after clicking on search.

Of course if you are after settings they are easily reached by moving to the bottom right corner then clicking on settings or if you are after more ADVANCED settings move the mouse to the bottom left hand corner and RIGHT click.

Once you work out all these new ways of getting to what you want you will end up thinking windows 8 is actually pretty good.

Because of the negative press I was scared to change but now I'm happy I did.

Microsoft's only screw up was not including a tutorial.

By shmaun on 20 Feb 2013

Try not to panic - End of Retail Sales nigh !!!!

What this article fails to mention is what Microsoft refers to as 'The End of Retail Sales Date'

http://windows.microsoft.com/en-GB/windows/product
s/lifecycle

Worth a gander at this link because it's clear apart from the resounding success of Windows XP MICROSOFT want to force us all to migrate to the latest OS every 3.5 years whether you like it or not. XPs reliability and all round user friendliness appeal made it the most popular OS for Microsoft. It's no surprise so many businesses and corporates still run with it forcing MS to extend the support date way way beyond what they wanted. You see the successfulness of an OS can be damaging to the bottom line of Microsoft as it's not aligned to their business model.
It consequently affects the up take of the next OS which was the awful Vista.

However Microsft are wise to this and aren't going to make this mistake again.

Do the maths expect the end of retail sales date to be appx 3.5 years from when they released Windows 7 - which will be right about Q2 2013. If you're a corporate user are you really going to bother with touch screen technology on the desktop, have the cost and headache of user training, the uncertainly of compatibility if everything just works the way it is supposed to ?? I thought not.

Better stock up on those Windows 7 retail boxes before they fly off the shelves. Oh by the way Windows 7 is supported up to 2020.

http://support.microsoft.com/lifecycle/?c2=14019

By Frank_Zane on 20 Feb 2013

Try not to panic - End of Retail Sales nigh !!!!

What this article fails to mention is what Microsoft refers to as 'The End of Retail Sales Date'

http://windows.microsoft.com/en-GB/windows/product
s/lifecycle

Worth a gander at this link because it's clear apart from the resounding success of Windows XP MICROSOFT want to force us all to migrate to the latest OS every 3.5 years whether you like it or not. XPs reliability and all round user friendliness appeal made it the most popular OS for Microsoft. It's no surprise so many businesses and corporates still run with it forcing MS to extend the support date way way beyond what they wanted. You see the successfulness of an OS can be damaging to the bottom line of Microsoft as it's not aligned to their business model.
It consequently affects the up take of the next OS which was the awful Vista.

However Microsft are wise to this and aren't going to make this mistake again.

Do the maths expect the end of retail sales date to be appx 3.5 years from when they released Windows 7 - which will be right about Q2 2013. If you're a corporate user are you really going to bother with touch screen technology on the desktop, have the cost and headache of user training, the uncertainly of compatibility if everything just works the way it is supposed to ?? I thought not.

Better stock up on those Windows 7 retail boxes before they fly off the shelves. Oh by the way Windows 7 is supported up to 2020.

http://support.microsoft.com/lifecycle/?c2=14019

By Frank_Zane on 20 Feb 2013

Machine Silver

During beta, RC and customer preview phases, Microsoft were told again and again by IT professionals that W8 would need to have the option of a start menu, that users would struggle with it and that business would be slow to take it up. W8 is useless without touch hardware. Businesses won't want the cost of scrapping all their existing kit and touch won't be attractive to office users who share PCs. Most PCs and laptops being supplied to the public are still non-touch enabled.

You would think that after the Windows Vista fiasco that Microsoft would take more note of what its customers think.

By MartinBird on 21 Feb 2013

If you want the quick intro to Windows 8...

... just go here:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wi8NpwiEuzc&list=UU
L-fHOdarou-CR2XUmK48Og

It's a 4 minute intro video. At the beginning of the video he puts up a link to the longer (25 minute) version.

By RogerSpencelayh on 21 Feb 2013

W8 is useless without touch hardware.

@MartinBird - Not so. A mouse works just as well as a finger, and in any case most people who do work on their PC will be using the desktop. Boot up (

By RogerSpencelayh on 21 Feb 2013

W8 is useless without touch hardware

Oops, seems I can't use a less than symbol here.
@MartinBird - Not so. A mouse works just as well as a finger, and in any case most people who do work on their PC will be using the desktop. Boot up (less than 20 seconds vs. over a minute on Win 7), hit the Windows key and I'm on the desktop with all my main applications on the task bar a single click away.

By RogerSpencelayh on 21 Feb 2013

Why not offer an alternative Classic interface?

Microsoft should simply offer a Classic interface as an alternative to the Tiled interface.
Technically, it's no big deal and it seems to me blindingly obvious that most business users and casual home users will prefer something they know, just as the growing market of people who spend much of their day on smart phones, pads etc. will prefer the tiles.
It's just corporate arrogance that stops them, IMHO.

By Walsallian on 21 Feb 2013

Classic startmenu

Classic Startmenu already exists as a third-party offering, and it makes Win8 far more useable. Not that I'd use Win8 by choice though.

I don't see why people who use smartphones will prefer the tiles, though. Tiles are a compromise for situations where you don't have a mouse, only a very blunt and inaccurate fingertip. They are an awkward arrangement at best. A bit like preferring pliers when you have a spanner.

By Anteaus on 21 Feb 2013

Sales do not equla installs

MS may have sold 60 Million licences but I doubt very much there are that many installs.
Companies often buy PC with the latest licence then put an older OS on the PC. We are still putting XP on our new PCs and are only just moving to Windows 7, I doubt very much we will move to Windows 8 any time soon. We will wait until Windows 9 and users have learnt the new way in their own time.
Having said that my Boss loves Windows 8 and thinks people just need to use it for a while, I have it installed at home with Startdock's Start8 which for the most part makes it quite usable for me, I still hate the metro apps that do seem a tad unstable at times, I have several crashes of Microsoft's own Solitaire games.
If they ever do a Metro version of Outlook that will be the last straw.
MS should dump Bullmer and bring back Bill, never thought I would say that!

By Lorribot on 21 Feb 2013

windows 8 for play windows 7 for work.

My Win 7 workhorse Toshiba Laptop started to die in January. I took delivery of a Lenovo Z580. I tried W8 and realised its a restless toy OS. I put Start 8 and various other W8 workrounds. They helped but W8 was hindering me from working. I wanted a familiar machine. I did not want Boys Toys. I decided to put W7 on instead. Sadly Lenovo had locked down the EUFI/BIOS so W7 wouldn't install. Lenovo returned as unusable. New Toshiba arrived, EUFI/BIOS unlocked, Win 7 installed. Now I have completely usable machine back. Bybye W8.
Why bother to reinvent W7 on top of W8? W8 has NO BENEFIT for me. W7 boots fast, runs all my software, serves my needs.
And its supported for 7 more years!

Nick

By nickmoul100 on 21 Feb 2013

windows 8 for play windows 7 for work.

My Win 7 workhorse Toshiba Laptop started to die in January. I took delivery of a Lenovo Z580. I tried W8 and realised its a restless toy OS. I put Start 8 and various other W8 workrounds. They helped but W8 was hindering me from working. I wanted a familiar machine. I did not want Boys Toys. I decided to put W7 on instead. Sadly Lenovo had locked down the EUFI/BIOS so W7 wouldn't install. Lenovo returned as unusable. New Toshiba arrived, EUFI/BIOS unlocked, Win 7 installed. Now I have completely usable machine back. Bybye W8.
Why bother to reinvent W7 on top of W8? W8 has NO BENEFIT for me. W7 boots fast, runs all my software, serves my needs.
And its supported for 7 more years!

Nick

By nickmoul100 on 21 Feb 2013

Solution to: Why not offer an alternative Classic interface?

Um they do. On my start screen I have a tile for my browser that I always open when I start my computer. I click on that and windows takes me to the desktop and opens my browser. This is effectively the same one click I used to make before to open my browser.

From there you don't have to ever use the tiled menu. You can stay quite happily in desktop mode all day. The only difference being the functions of the start button being spread to different places and there being slightly different ways of doing things, but you can effectively stay on the desktop. (The search is sort of tiled based)

I wouldn't normally agree with the boss but from a post above " my Boss loves Windows 8 and thinks people just need to use it for a while." I 100% agree. You just have to accept a small amount of CHANGE, something that many people don't like.

By shmaun on 21 Feb 2013

Top Desktop Manufacturers will soon rebel

Someone commented that small system builders' tactics could not be used to gauge the failure of W8 and suggested that Dell, HP etc would be more typical. So I looked on Dell's site and tried to configure something similar to my desktop (Core i7 Gen 3), selected W7 64bit rather than W8 ---- guess what? "No configurations are valid for the chosen filters." If this is true for all their PCs then Dell's sales of W8 will be 100%. BUT 100% of diddly squat is still DIDDLY SQUAT! W8 is a complete disaster for anything serious, and I am certain Dell and the other big desktop/laptop/netbook builders are all screaming at Bill Gates to do something. I bet the W7 to W8 upgrade sales dropped to zero on 1st Feb.

By Scurvy on 21 Feb 2013

Windows 8 Not for Laptops or Desktops

Having used and worked with every Windows operating system since Win 95, Windows 8 is without any doubt the worst mistake Microsoft have made. Windows 8 maybe fine or a tablet or mobile phone but for a laptop or desktop pc it is a no go. Even Vista is a viable alternative to Win 8 in a office environment for home users Windows 7 has to be the system to use. I shall never re-install Windows 8, I purchased it on the release date and was horified when the installation completed, I gave it a week and removed it. I returned it to the place of purchase and got a full refund. I will change to a Mac when the time comes, as iPads and iPhones do not share the same operating system as a Mac why do Microsoft try to swing this on us for all devices, it just does not work!

By slaughts1 on 21 Feb 2013

O/s similarities?

I have a WP8 Nokia and upgraded my old laptop from Vista (which was terrible anyway) to W8. I now have a sea of tiles on my laptop to wade through to find anything, yet on the phone, one swipe sideways and I am faced with a nice list of Apps in alphabetical order just like a traditional start menu! I bought 2 copies of W8 pro upgrade, one is unopened as w7 ultimate on the desktop is so easy to use. As for complaints about every new o/s, I don't remember many complaints about moving from Millennium to XP or from Vista to W7 apart from driver issues.

By R4N6ER5RE4DY on 21 Feb 2013

O/s similarities?

I have a WP8 Nokia and upgraded my old laptop from Vista (which was terrible anyway) to W8. I now have a sea of tiles on my laptop to wade through to find anything, yet on the phone, one swipe sideways and I am faced with a nice list of Apps in alphabetical order just like a traditional start menu! I bought 2 copies of W8 pro upgrade, one is unopened as w7 ultimate on the desktop is so easy to use. As for complaints about every new o/s, I don't remember many complaints about moving from Millennium to XP or from Vista to W7 apart from driver issues.

By R4N6ER5RE4DY on 21 Feb 2013

O/s similarities?

I have a WP8 Nokia and upgraded my old laptop from Vista (which was terrible anyway) to W8. I now have a sea of tiles on my laptop to wade through to find anything, yet on the phone, one swipe sideways and I am faced with a nice list of Apps in alphabetical order just like a traditional start menu! I bought 2 copies of W8 pro upgrade, one is unopened as w7 ultimate on the desktop is so easy to use. As for complaints about every new o/s, I don't remember many complaints about moving from Millennium to XP or from Vista to W7 apart from driver issues.

By R4N6ER5RE4DY on 21 Feb 2013

O/s similarities?

I have a WP8 Nokia and upgraded my old laptop from Vista (which was terrible anyway) to W8. I now have a sea of tiles on my laptop to wade through to find anything, yet on the phone, one swipe sideways and I am faced with a nice list of Apps in alphabetical order just like a traditional start menu! I bought 2 copies of W8 pro upgrade, one is unopened as w7 ultimate on the desktop is so easy to use. As for complaints about every new o/s, I don't remember many complaints about moving from Millennium to XP or from Vista to W7 apart from driver issues.

By R4N6ER5RE4DY on 21 Feb 2013

Windows 8 - An Emotional Look

I got so p'd off at all the BS about Windows 8 that I decided to educate some on how to use it in a practical sense. I only showed a few quick things and I apologise for being overly-emotional in the video LOL. I just hate seeing an excellent OS being criticised by the clueless. The video is still uploading as I type... the link will be:

http://sdrv.ms/158KymI

@Brendan: Your comment about learning new shortcut keys, why would you? That basically says it all...can't be bothered learning new things. The shortcuts are:
Windows Key + Q = search app
Windows Key + F = search files
Windows Key + W = search settings

A few very useful shortcuts while in Modern UI Apps are:
Windows Key + I = settings (options, etc.)
Windows Key + Q = search
Windows Key + H = share

By cooloox on 22 Feb 2013

@Slaughts1

View my video at http://sdrv.ms/158KymI once it finishes uploading and then tell me what is wrong with Windows 8!!

I totally disagree with you and I believe Windows 8 is way more productive on a non-touch device. Charms slow you down and my video shows this. I NEVER use charms.


Please tell me what you believe is more productive in Windows 7, after watching the video. I am happy to make a second video to cover more things (without the rants this time).

By cooloox on 22 Feb 2013

@Slaughts1

View my video at http://sdrv.ms/158KymI once it finishes uploading and then tell me what is wrong with Windows 8!!

I totally disagree with you and I believe Windows 8 is way more productive on a non-touch device. Charms slow you down and my video shows this. I NEVER use charms.


Please tell me what you believe is more productive in Windows 7, after watching the video. I am happy to make a second video to cover more things (without the rants this time).

By cooloox on 22 Feb 2013

Solution for O/s similarities?

@ R4N6ER5RE4DY

2 ways to find what you want on the start screen.

1. Just start typing the name of what you want and press enter or select it when you have typed enough of the name.
2. The start screen is fully customisable. Drag the icons into groups or just move your most used programs to a convenient location and search when you use a less often used program.

Also PC Pro has a good article with a few good ideas. Windows 8: 15 tips and tricks http://www.pcpro.co.uk/features/379516/windows-8-1
5-tips-and-tricks

By shmaun on 22 Feb 2013

@shmaun

Thanks for the link to the 15 Tips article. That is quite good!

By cooloox on 22 Feb 2013

@nickmoul100

Hi Nick, how about instead of making lightweight comments like "Windows 8 was hindering me from doing work" you actually back that up with examples? I can get to anything in Windows 8 as quick or quicker than Windows 7 without any start button replacement. What was hindering you?

By cooloox on 24 Feb 2013

Windows 8

On clicking things on the first page with all the clutter why do micro$oft expect me to want a mail account? I'm quite happy with my service provider and thunderbird for email.

By tyronet2000 on 25 Apr 2013

Leave a comment

You need to Login or Register to comment.

(optional)

advertisement

Most Commented News Stories
Latest Blog Posts Subscribe to our RSS Feeds
Latest ReviewsSubscribe to our RSS Feeds
Latest Real World Computing

advertisement

Sponsored Links
 
SEARCH
Loading
WEB ID
SIGN UP

Your email:

Your password:

remember me

advertisement


Hitwise Top 10 Website 2010
 
 

PCPro-Computing in the Real World Printed from www.pcpro.co.uk

Register to receive our regular email newsletter at http://www.pcpro.co.uk/registration.

The newsletter contains links to our latest PC news, product reviews, features and how-to guides, plus special offers and competitions.