Skip to navigation
Latest News

ISPs "should publish list of blocked sites"

road closed

By Stewart Mitchell

Posted on 6 Dec 2012 at 10:52

The Open Rights Group (ORG) has called on ISPs and the music industry to publish lists of the web addresses blocked in a bid to thwart piracy.

ISPs have been ordered to block some sites following court orders concerning sites, such as Newzbin and The Pirate Bay, because they enabled illegal downloading.

While the initial injunctions targeted piracy sites directly, they also allowed other sites to be blocked if they allowed access to sites via alternative addresses, with music industry lobby group the BPI providing ISPs with the rogue addresses.

According to ORG, the lists should be transparent in order to stop legal sites being added to the lists and blocking access on the say-so of the BPI.

We call on ISPs and the BPI to publish the blocking lists in the name of legal transparency and public accountability

The Pirate Bay injunction allows the BPI ask ISP to block “www.thepiratebay.se, sub-domains and any other IP address or url whose sole or predominant purpose is to enable or facilitate access to The Pirate Bay website”.

However, this week a site called The Promo Bay was added to the list of sites that were wrapped up with The Pirate Bay, and was blocked by the major UK ISPs.

Although launched by The Pirate Bay, The Promo Bay site is actually a promotional platform for musicians and other creative who are happy for people to download their work in a bid to gain momentum.

ORG believes that with no external scrutiny other sites could be added to the list at the BPI's bidding, and could effectively censor parts of the web that were not meant to be part of injunctions.

"The BPI intends to obtain blocking orders for some 50-100 websites. Each order allows the BPI to create a ban list of clone sites or IP addresses,” said Jim Killock, executive director of ORG. "These ban lists could end up blocking perhaps 500 or more domains and IP addresses, all the at the behest of the BPI.

"There is a clear need for transparency, as mistakes are already being made, and are only being corrected because of public pressure. We call on ISPs and the BPI to publish the blocking lists in the name of legal transparency and public accountability."

We have asked the BPI for more information on how the system works, and are waiting to hear back.

Is your business a social business? For helpful info and tips visit our hub.

Subscribe to PC Pro magazine. We'll give you 3 issues for £1 plus a free gift - click here
User comments

What a surprise…

So genie is out of the bottle. China and Iran censors Internet for one reason, we for another. We should just stop pretending that we have free and open Internet and they don't...

By aa111 on 6 Dec 2012

"legal" sites?

As defined by who? The Pirate Bay wasn't illegal, no more than Google or any other search engine. The music industry picked them out because of their site name.
The current policy seems that anyone with enough money and lawyers can have the internet censored in civil court for any reason.

By cheysuli on 6 Dec 2012

I'm as appalled about this censoring as anybody but, @cheysuli, come on - Pirate Bay not illegal? People only visit that website for one reason.

As much as it may not hold the illegal content, when a site is used for one purpose and one purpose only - the sharing of illegal content, which Pirate Bay make no attempt to quash - then I think you're on dodgy ground.

David.

By artiss on 7 Dec 2012

I'm as appalled about this censoring as anybody but, @cheysuli, come on - Pirate Bay not illegal? People only visit that website for one reason.

As much as it may not hold the illegal content, when a site is used for one purpose and one purpose only - the sharing of illegal content, which Pirate Bay make no attempt to quash - then I think you're on dodgy ground.

David.

By artiss on 7 Dec 2012

I think this is great not only because legal sites could get blacklisted, but because the revelation of which sites are blocked by ISPs can cause political pressure / crackdowns on them to reduce censorship at large. Sure, TPB is widely used for finding copyrighted materials, but I want to know who is blocking access.

By sergvolkov00 on 9 Dec 2012

Leave a comment

You need to Login or Register to comment.

(optional)

advertisement

Most Commented News Stories
Latest Blog Posts Subscribe to our RSS Feeds
Latest ReviewsSubscribe to our RSS Feeds
Latest Real World Computing

advertisement

Sponsored Links
 
SEARCH
Loading
WEB ID
SIGN UP

Your email:

Your password:

remember me

advertisement


Hitwise Top 10 Website 2010
 
 

PCPro-Computing in the Real World Printed from www.pcpro.co.uk

Register to receive our regular email newsletter at http://www.pcpro.co.uk/registration.

The newsletter contains links to our latest PC news, product reviews, features and how-to guides, plus special offers and competitions.