Seagate creates 1TB/square inch hard drives

hard disk

Heat assisting data writing could lead to 60TB drives - but not until 2030

Seagate claims it has paved the way for 3.5in hard drives with 60TB capacities after breaking the 1TB/square inch density threshold.

According to the company, it has produced a working demonstration of technology that could double the storage capacity of hard drives when it is introduced into commercial hardware later his decade, with the technology scaling up to 60TB drives by 2030.

The company said the breakthrough relied on heat-assisted magnetic recording (HAMR) that allows data to be written closer together without impacting or corrupting neighbouring data.

“Hard disk drive innovations like HAMR will be a key enabler of the development of even more data-intense applications in the future, extending the ways businesses and consumers worldwide use, manage and store digital content,” said Mark Re, senior vice president of Heads and Media Research and Development at Seagate.

The technology is expected to replace the Perpendicular Magnetic Recording techniques used to write to today’s hard drive platters.

Seagate said that HAMR techniques had allowed it to record a linear bit density of two million bits per inch, resulting in a data density of just over 1 trillion bits, or 1TB per square inch, marking a 55% improvement on the current 620GB/square inch ceiling.

Such high-density disks would more than double storage capacities in the first generation, the company said, up to 6TB for 3.5-inch drives and 2TB for 2.5-inch models.

"The technology offers a scale of capacity growth never before possible, with a theoretical areal density limit ranging from between 5 and 10TB/square inch, or 30TB to 60TB for 3.5-inch drives and 10TB to 20TB for 2.5-inch drives," the company said.

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