ACS Law's file-sharing case: news roundup

3 Feb 2011
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We trace the ongoing saga of the file-sharing letter campaigns

The use of so-called "speculative invoicing" to target illegal file-sharers could be about to come to an end.

Under the scheme, law firms sent out letters demanding settlement at risk of court action to people identified by IP address data as having downloaded copyright files. No such cases have been successful in UK courts.

Despite the pair now wishing to drop more than two dozen cases they brought to the court, Judge Birss of the Patents County Court has now closed the case, with costs still to be decided.

ACS Law has already said it is moving out of the anti-piracy business, succumbing to financial pressure and threats against sole solicitor Andrew Crossley's family.

See below for PC Pro's coverage of ACS Law and the file-sharing letter campaign, and check back for updates from the Patents County Court, Solicitors Disciplinary Tribunal, and more.

The luxury lifestyle of the "hard-up" file-sharing lawyer
File-sharing lawyer avoids big ICO fine because he's too poor
Judge: ACS Law's conduct was "chaotic and lamentable"
Judge considers costs as ACS Law case shut down
ACS Law case casts doubt over DEA evidence
Barrister fears ACS Law will be back
File-sharing lawyers ACS Law shuts down
File-sharing lawyers face warning letter ban
Exposed: file-sharing lawyers collect fines using 'dormant' company
Judge refuses to drop ACS Law file-sharing cases
Can music bosses catch the pirates?
Judge deals blow to file-sharing lawyers
File-sharing lawyer "bullies" face tribunal
BT sent unencrypted customer data to file-sharing lawyers
Piracy law firm leak raises privacy concerns
Ministry of Sound blames BT for file-sharing failure
BT prepping challenges over file-sharing court orders
Ministry of Sound downed by file-sharing vigilantes
Law firm: unsecured Wi-Fi is no file-sharing defence
BPI distances itself from file-sharing lawyers
150 "falsely accused" of illegal file-sharing

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