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How Apple lulls Mac owners into a false sense of security

Posted on 3 Feb 2012 at 15:00

Davey Winder says Apple's claims that Mac owners need not worry about security are dangerous

Is it any wonder that many Mac owners think they are immune from the security problems faced by PC owners? Right there on the Apple website it states that "with virtually no effort on your part, OS X defends against viruses and other malicious applications, or malware".

When security vendor ESET surveyed computer users about their perception of computer security, more than half thought PCs were either very or extremely vulnerable, whereas the figure was only 20% when it came to the Mac.

The same survey revealed that when it comes to phishing attacks, Mac users lost more money on average than PC owners did. Is Apple guilty of lulling its users into a false sense of security?

Macs not susceptible?

David Emm, the senior security researcher at Kaspersky Lab, told PC Pro that the inclusion of a signature-based scanner in OS X "represents an acknowledgement by Apple itself that the Mac is not immune to malware". Yet if you head over to Apple.com and read the Why You'll Love a Mac section it may surprise, or even sadden you, to discover some of the claims being made about how secure a Mac is.

Mac malware


Dan Clark works for security vendor ESET, and told PC Pro about a number of significant Mac malware incidents uncovered in its Labs in 2011:

"The first was the MacDefender fake antivirus product. Users would typically encounter the virus when opening an infected image found on a search engine. When the infected file was loaded, an alert would be presented warning the user that viruses were detected. If the user clicked on the alert box, the actual MacDefender malware would be downloaded. The software would then run a phony "scan" and then ask the user for money when it pretended to detect malware running on the machine.

Later in the year, ESET saw several other exploits, including Revir.A, a Chinese language PDF that attempted to drop a Trojan into a user's system; Flashback, a more serious attack that came out in September of 2011, which if installed, would disable the update features of the OS X malware defence system; and at the end of the year, DevilRobber was deployed through pirated software, which "minted" BitCoin currency, and also installed a backdoor for remote access, a screen grabber and other functions."

Take, for example, the headline which claims you can "Safeguard your data - by doing nothing" which is naïve at best, and arguably both misleading and dangerous. The reader is informed that "a Mac isn't susceptible to the thousands of viruses plaguing Windows-based computers" and goes on to suggest that this is "thanks to built-in defences in Mac OS X that keep you safe, without any work on your part". Erm, no it isn't. It's actually because Windows viruses are, obviously, coded to run on Windows and not OS X.

Another somewhat dubious claim is the one that states that "when a potential security threat arises, Apple responds quickly by providing software updates and security enhancements". Taking three years to fix a known vulnerability concerning the FinFisher remote spying Trojan, or the average of 91 days one prominent security expert discovered Apple took from first being notified of a serious security vulnerability to issuing a fix, wouldn't be what most people would regard as "quickly".

And at the end of last year when Google, Mozilla and Microsoft responded swiftly to blacklist hundreds of fraudulent SSL certificates following the DigiNotar hack, Apple lagged behind in issuing a security update to provide Safari users with the same protection, casting doubt over the Apple.com claim that "if you visit a suspicious site, Safari disables the page and displays an alert warning you about its suspect nature".

"False illusion"

Dr Wieland Alge, the general manager at security vendor Barracuda Networks warns that users are "under a false illusion if they think they are safe because it is an Apple product" adding that "the threat is very real and no longer restricted to PC users".

Indeed, as Dr Alge pointed out, the first OS X virus was discovered in 2006, and during 2011 a number of incidents were reported including a malware attack disguised as antivirus software that duped Mac users into handing over credit card details. Yes, the MacDefender scareware did require the user to be conned into installing the rogue application and Apple did, eventually, respond with a security update to warn against doing just that. However, it does rather blow apart the myth that Mac users are somehow immune from malware; especially when it adopts the social engineering route that Windows users are so often exposed to.

Apple, despite its protestations to the contrary, will have to prepare for even more of these attacks as OS X and iOS market share increases and malware writers become increasingly interested in them. Mikko Hypponen, chief research officer at F-Secure, has even gone on the record to state that "the current security level of Windows 7 is better than on Mac OS X" adding that "it's more likely we will see a major mobile worm outbreak on the iPhone than on smartphones running Windows Phone".

Intego develops antivirus and security products for the Mac platform, so perhaps it should come as no surprise that CEO Jeff Erwin agrees that the Mac platform is no more secure than Windows. "The question today is not whether one platform is more secure than another," Erwin told PC Pro, continuing "most operating systems have built-in defences that make malware dissemination very difficult".

iOS vs Android

Rik Ferguson is the director of security research at Trend Micro, and warns that things are very different to Mac vs PC when it comes to iOS vs Android. There simply is no iOS malware existing outside of 'jailbroken' devices, courtesy of the Apple walled garden approach to app development and distribution:

“This is very much about open vs closed application distribution systems. The problem pertinent to Android is not that the OS itself is open source, but that the app distribution mechanism is entirely open. Android embraces the concept of multiple third party marketplaces in addition to the 'official' marketplace, but even in the 'official' marketplace there is no upfront vetting of code or functionality.

Couple that with the undeniable and deserved popularity of the platform, it is no surprise that criminals are already actively exploiting an opportunity here. It's not the open source, it's the openness of the source. TrendLabs for example have documented a 1,410% increase in Android malware in the period January to July 2011.

While this rate of increase is starting from a low base, those four-figure increases are not as shocking as they may first appear. In raw numbers the total amount of malware is of course orders of magnitude lower than, for example, the Wintel platform. However the more important figure is not the total number of malware, but the rate of increase of that malware quarter-on-quarter and year-on-year. That demonstrates current, active and sustained criminal interest in the mobile platform. It's not complicated, criminals follow consumers; always have, always will."

Indeed, it's the changing nature of the threat - away from viruses into malware and beyond to user manipulation - that leaves Apple even more exposed. This is where Mac users may even be at a disadvantage, as they have not had the same exposure to online dangers as Windows users and are therefore more likely to be complacent about both the attack mechanisms and the consequences of becoming a victim. "Many of the current threats are not based on attacking the actual device we use, but the way that we communicate and use internet platforms, social networks etc," Dr Alge explains, concluding "the perceived, and long-held view that Apple products are safe as they are designed with security in mind is becoming increasingly invalid".

Safer - but for how long?

Yes, Macs are safer than PCs for now - simply because there are more Windows users out there to target. The Mac itself, however, is not somehow magically impenetrable, and as its attack surface increases along with its market share, you can expect to see exploits starting to take hold.

As Trend Micro's director of security research, Rik Ferguson, points out "the fact that that user base is largely unprepared and the computers themselves largely unprotected only increases the attractiveness".

Remember that as far as the codebase is concerned, the current swathe of hackers and cybercriminals have a ton of experience in exploiting Windows and very little hands-on knowledge of OS X, and that's why the number of Windows malware exploits continues to rise. Within the next few years, however, you can expect to see a situation, which is starting already, where security threats are platform agnostic.

Security is now less about the operating system deployed, and more about the user deploying it...

Author: Davey Winder

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User comments

Great article. As someone who uses Linux, Windows and OSX daily, (all personal use) and hasn't been victim to any malware in.. years.. I can do nothing but agree to the final line of the article.

Despite having a Windows machine (that I game on) and doing most of my computing on OSX (Linux on my servers), I rarely feel less secure on any of them in comparison to the other.

Of course, software vulnerabilities exist and Windows is the bigger target, but the weakest link in the chain for your home computers is the user. When Apple are choosing to take this route in advertising security on the Mac, they are making that weak link in the chain even weaker.

It's dangerous, very dangerous.

By QassimF on 3 Feb 2012

Great article. As someone who uses Linux, Windows and OSX daily, (all personal use) and hasn't been victim to any malware in.. years.. I can do nothing but agree to the final line of the article.

Despite having a Windows machine (that I game on) and doing most of my computing on OSX (Linux on my servers), I rarely feel less secure on any of them in comparison to the other.

Of course, software vulnerabilities exist and Windows is the bigger target, but the weakest link in the chain for your home computers is the user. When Apple are choosing to take this route in advertising security on the Mac, they are making that weak link in the chain even weaker.

It's dangerous, very dangerous.

By QassimF on 3 Feb 2012

basically...

ERROR 107754701: Replace user and reboot.

By josephlck on 3 Feb 2012

PC Users Live in Cholera Country, Mac Users Do Not

Just like in theory, you can get cholera but in most countries, it's pretty much near impossible. The last time there was a cholera case was the last time there was a damaging mac virus or trojan. Yes, OC users might not believe it - it's true. the last real virus on the Mac was in the 1987? It screwed the header info on Word docs - not exactly the WIn trojan's that use your Pc as a bot or shut down thousands of systems. So, is it possible - of course, but so far, no major problems in 35 years - and NOTHING since @1988. Yes, really, no lies. Simply the truth. Same with IOS ... yes, 300 MILLION users worldwide, ZERO issues. Just like you don't worry about cholera, on a mac, we don't worry about security issues. So, don't drink sewage in a Southern continent and don't use a PC worldwide, it's a proven theorem and very simple rule of thumb.

By jbelkin on 4 Feb 2012

I'm so sick of these articles

It is not impossible for a Mac to be infected by malware.

That said this article started with 50% of people thinking PC were at risk and 20% thinking macs are at risk. Which says that people think you are safer on a mac than a PC. Which you freely admit!!!

For the past decade (increasing in numbers each year) people keep talking about how bad this year will be for the Mac OS and Viruses and Malware and every year they are proven wrong!

So what is the take away here. If macs are at risk should we purchase and load anti virus software. Waste time with daily patches and scans? How stupid is that when the threat is virtually non-existant. How much time have I saved ignoring people like you over the past 12 years?

The truth is Apple has been just as quick as it has needed to be to keep it's users safe. You mention vulnerabilities that Apple took it's sweet time fixing but fail to mention that ZERO attacks were used against those.

I'm reminded of a joke. Two men are in the woods when they see a hungry bear running toward them. One man puts on his shoes and laces them tight while the other man explains how stupid it is to do such a thing because even with shoes the bear can easily out run him. The first man looks up with a smile and says "I don't have to out run the bear! I just have to out run you!". That is the way it is for viruses today. All apple has to do is continue to make it non-profitable to attack the Mac vs Windows.

Some day your words may be true, and when there are real threats for the Mac it will be such huge news that everyone will know and on that day, I'll start worrying about it.

By dpetrosky on 4 Feb 2012

missing the point

The previous comments are missing the point of the article. Yes OSX is secure, and as secure as a fully patched win PC. The point is because MAC users are told they are safe in their bubble they are more likely to take risks when it comes to social engineering scams.

as each year at the hacking comps show all three main OS'es stand up to direct attach it is only when some form of social engineering is applied that the holes appear. Telling users that they are safe and not to worry is probably not the best strategy.

By SimonCorlett on 4 Feb 2012

Physician heal thyself

Kaspersky and F-Secure should come up with better products for OS X. I have to support products from both on Macs. Kaspersky never seems to detect anything other than Windows viruses on the Mac and Antivirus for Mac gives me nothing but false positives all the time.

I've seen malware on Linux too, on a server with Symantec Antivirus for Linux running.

I'm not saying that products such as these are not needed; the fact that I have them at all means I think they are necessary. I do think they should work, though.

The article is right though that the weakest point on any OS now is the user.

By John_Greythorne on 4 Feb 2012

Volvo produce the safest cars

If enough people believe in the myth, then they believe it must be the truth.

By Duggie on 4 Feb 2012

@jbelkin

There has been plenty of malware for OS X in recent years, as the article pointed out.

That malware over the years has changed from using self replication to using wetware errors doesn't mean that OS X is invulnerable to attack - as the MacDefender case showed.

Malware doesn't have to be a virus any more, that is harder work to implement and there are much easier ways to infect a computer. PEBCAK errors are the biggest malware vector today.

It is laughably easy to infect Windows, OS X or Linux with malware. You don't need to know any unpatched vulnerabilities, you just need gullible users.

Whether the malware is installed through a fishing attack or a simple trojan, it doesn't matter, as long as the user is gullible enough to install it.

So, it isn't a Virus, so what, it is still malware and can still cause havoc on the machine.

@Duggie the problem with Volvo cars in the 80s was the drivers, they believed they were driving the safest cars, so they often drove accordingly - like complete plonkers, putting other people at risk!

Simon Corlett is correct. It doesn't matter how secure OS X is (and from a technical standpoint, it has fallen behind), it is how gullible the users are - hence the MacDefender problem last year, which jbelking and dpetrosky both seem to have ignored in their arguments.

By big_D on 6 Feb 2012

I have an iPad and iPhone with a virus

I am a former Sr. Unix Admin, IT Director who started out as a PC Technician. My first computer was a Timex Sinclair, so let's just say I'm technically inclined as a hobbyist and a professional.

While using my iPad recently I noticed that my google search results were going to the website askthecrew.net instead of the actual URL's listed. I recognized instantly that this was a Google Redirect Virus and yet it took my brain even longer to accept that it was now somehow on my original iPad with IOS 5. At first I thought, well, I didn't know what to think so I closed all of the tabs, rebooted the device and tried again. Same problem. Next I went and cleared my cache, history, etc and even disabled Safari, rebooted it, re-enabled Safari and tried again. Problem solv... You see, the redirect to askthecrew went away, but I noticed something happening that was weird...

Clicking on any google search result would now redirect to another site, creditpuma.com, and then very quickly go to the site I originally wanted to see.

I'm sure that this site collects my information, cookies... whatever it can grab really and then makes a nice profit selling it off to dishonest (and honest) marketing companies.

Let me stop here in my narrative and say that this iPad has never seen a jailbreak. It has never been exposed to anything unusual other than my own app development of an app that is currently in the store and does little more than pull RSS info. I has never been abducted by Russian hackers and when not used for my business, is used by a housewife who plays games, and occasionally shops online.

After an evening of backing up my data, taking my iPad to the Genius Bar at my local Apple store, searching the internet and trying to restore my iPad to factory settings - including deleting .ipsw file in iTunes (which forces a reinstall of IOS 5) - my device is still infected. It still redirects.

It is JavaScript based, because if I turn that off, the problem goes away, but that is not a solution is it?

And then, I tried my wife's iPhone 4, which has not been updated to IOS 5. It has the same exact problem, only that phone never experienced the 'askthecrew' redirect, it simply does the quick redirect to creditpuma and back to where it should be.

I checked my own phone, thinking, well maybe my internet is goofy. Yes, I know, this makes no sense, but I had to try and my iPhone 4 (IOS 5) and it works exactly as it should. No virus. No redirect. No issues at all. (I don't use Safari on my Mac, but Chrome worked fine, as did IE on my Laptop)

Here is the big fat scary - on the iPhone the address bar can often disappear before you even see where you are going. This virus could be on a lot of phones and nobody would notice it even if they were technically inclined . I went out of my way to look for it, and found it. Even if you can see the address bar (like on the iPad) it can happen so fast you don't even think about it - or assume it's just the website itself redirecting you to another page.

Further - I don't think this happened via an App. I use the iPad a few times a week and this virus was not there a week ago, and no common apps have been downloaded (or updated) between the iPad and iPhone.

The people at the Apple store can't help, the best advice I could find on the Internet was to remove the .ipsw file, and I'm not about to pay Apple $30 for phone support to help them fix a serious security flaw in their own OS, which would likely take them 3 months to fix with their current track record.

Still looking for solutions - and warning everyone - check your IOS devices for a Google Redirect Virus.

Nathaniel Beall
Feb 8, 2012

By barsmart on 8 Feb 2012

I have an iPad and iPhone with a virus

I am a former Sr. Unix Admin, IT Director who started out as a PC Technician. My first computer was a Timex Sinclair, so let's just say I'm technically inclined as a hobbyist and a professional.

While using my iPad recently I noticed that my google search results were going to the website askthecrew.net instead of the actual URL's listed. I recognized instantly that this was a Google Redirect Virus and yet it took my brain even longer to accept that it was now somehow on my original iPad with IOS 5. At first I thought, well, I didn't know what to think so I closed all of the tabs, rebooted the device and tried again. Same problem. Next I went and cleared my cache, history, etc and even disabled Safari, rebooted it, re-enabled Safari and tried again. Problem solv... You see, the redirect to askthecrew went away, but I noticed something happening that was weird...

Clicking on any google search result would now redirect to another site, creditpuma.com, and then very quickly go to the site I originally wanted to see.

I'm sure that this site collects my information, cookies... whatever it can grab really and then makes a nice profit selling it off to dishonest (and honest) marketing companies.

Let me stop here in my narrative and say that this iPad has never seen a jailbreak. It has never been exposed to anything unusual other than my own app development of an app that is currently in the store and does little more than pull RSS info. I has never been abducted by Russian hackers and when not used for my business, is used by a housewife who plays games, and occasionally shops online.

After an evening of backing up my data, taking my iPad to the Genius Bar at my local Apple store, searching the internet and trying to restore my iPad to factory settings - including deleting .ipsw file in iTunes (which forces a reinstall of IOS 5) - my device is still infected. It still redirects.

It is JavaScript based, because if I turn that off, the problem goes away, but that is not a solution is it?

And then, I tried my wife's iPhone 4, which has not been updated to IOS 5. It has the same exact problem, only that phone never experienced the 'askthecrew' redirect, it simply does the quick redirect to creditpuma and back to where it should be.

I checked my own phone, thinking, well maybe my internet is goofy. Yes, I know, this makes no sense, but I had to try and my iPhone 4 (IOS 5) and it works exactly as it should. No virus. No redirect. No issues at all. (I don't use Safari on my Mac, but Chrome worked fine, as did IE on my Laptop)

Here is the big fat scary - on the iPhone the address bar can often disappear before you even see where you are going. This virus could be on a lot of phones and nobody would notice it even if they were technically inclined . I went out of my way to look for it, and found it. Even if you can see the address bar (like on the iPad) it can happen so fast you don't even think about it - or assume it's just the website itself redirecting you to another page.

Further - I don't think this happened via an App. I use the iPad a few times a week and this virus was not there a week ago, and no common apps have been downloaded (or updated) between the iPad and iPhone.

The people at the Apple store can't help, the best advice I could find on the Internet was to remove the .ipsw file, and I'm not about to pay Apple $30 for phone support to help them fix a serious security flaw in their own OS, which would likely take them 3 months to fix with their current track record.

Still looking for solutions - and warning everyone - check your IOS devices for a Google Redirect Virus.

Nathaniel Beall
Feb 8, 2012

By barsmart on 8 Feb 2012

I have an iPad and iPhone with a virus

I am a former Sr. Unix Admin, IT Director who started out as a PC Technician. My first computer was a Timex Sinclair, so let's just say I'm technically inclined as a hobbyist and a professional.

While using my iPad recently I noticed that my google search results were going to the website askthecrew.net instead of the actual URL's listed. I recognized instantly that this was a Google Redirect Virus and yet it took my brain even longer to accept that it was now somehow on my original iPad with IOS 5. At first I thought, well, I didn't know what to think so I closed all of the tabs, rebooted the device and tried again. Same problem. Next I went and cleared my cache, history, etc and even disabled Safari, rebooted it, re-enabled Safari and tried again. Problem solv... You see, the redirect to askthecrew went away, but I noticed something happening that was weird...

Clicking on any google search result would now redirect to another site, creditpuma.com, and then very quickly go to the site I originally wanted to see.

I'm sure that this site collects my information, cookies... whatever it can grab really and then makes a nice profit selling it off to dishonest (and honest) marketing companies.

Let me stop here in my narrative and say that this iPad has never seen a jailbreak. It has never been exposed to anything unusual other than my own app development of an app that is currently in the store and does little more than pull RSS info. I has never been abducted by Russian hackers and when not used for my business, is used by a housewife who plays games, and occasionally shops online.

After an evening of backing up my data, taking my iPad to the Genius Bar at my local Apple store, searching the internet and trying to restore my iPad to factory settings - including deleting .ipsw file in iTunes (which forces a reinstall of IOS 5) - my device is still infected. It still redirects.

It is JavaScript based, because if I turn that off, the problem goes away, but that is not a solution is it?

And then, I tried my wife's iPhone 4, which has not been updated to IOS 5. It has the same exact problem, only that phone never experienced the 'askthecrew' redirect, it simply does the quick redirect to creditpuma and back to where it should be.

I checked my own phone, thinking, well maybe my internet is goofy. Yes, I know, this makes no sense, but I had to try and my iPhone 4 (IOS 5) and it works exactly as it should. No virus. No redirect. No issues at all. (I don't use Safari on my Mac, but Chrome worked fine, as did IE on my Laptop)

Here is the big fat scary - on the iPhone the address bar can often disappear before you even see where you are going. This virus could be on a lot of phones and nobody would notice it even if they were technically inclined . I went out of my way to look for it, and found it. Even if you can see the address bar (like on the iPad) it can happen so fast you don't even think about it - or assume it's just the website itself redirecting you to another page.

Further - I don't think this happened via an App. I use the iPad a few times a week and this virus was not there a week ago, and no common apps have been downloaded (or updated) between the iPad and iPhone.

The people at the Apple store can't help, the best advice I could find on the Internet was to remove the .ipsw file, and I'm not about to pay Apple $30 for phone support to help them fix a serious security flaw in their own OS, which would likely take them 3 months to fix with their current track record.

Still looking for solutions - and warning everyone - check your IOS devices for a Google Redirect Virus.

Nathaniel Beall
Feb 8, 2012

By barsmart on 8 Feb 2012

I have an iPad and iPhone with a virus

I am a former Sr. Unix Admin, IT Director who started out as a PC Technician. My first computer was a Timex Sinclair, so let's just say I'm technically inclined as a hobbyist and a professional.

While using my iPad recently I noticed that my google search results were going to the website askthecrew.net instead of the actual URL's listed. I recognized instantly that this was a Google Redirect Virus and yet it took my brain even longer to accept that it was now somehow on my original iPad with IOS 5. At first I thought, well, I didn't know what to think so I closed all of the tabs, rebooted the device and tried again. Same problem. Next I went and cleared my cache, history, etc and even disabled Safari, rebooted it, re-enabled Safari and tried again. Problem solv... You see, the redirect to askthecrew went away, but I noticed something happening that was weird...

Clicking on any google search result would now redirect to another site, creditpuma.com, and then very quickly go to the site I originally wanted to see.

I'm sure that this site collects my information, cookies... whatever it can grab really and then makes a nice profit selling it off to dishonest (and honest) marketing companies.

Let me stop here in my narrative and say that this iPad has never seen a jailbreak. It has never been exposed to anything unusual other than my own app development of an app that is currently in the store and does little more than pull RSS info. I has never been abducted by Russian hackers and when not used for my business, is used by a housewife who plays games, and occasionally shops online.

After an evening of backing up my data, taking my iPad to the Genius Bar at my local Apple store, searching the internet and trying to restore my iPad to factory settings - including deleting .ipsw file in iTunes (which forces a reinstall of IOS 5) - my device is still infected. It still redirects.

It is JavaScript based, because if I turn that off, the problem goes away, but that is not a solution is it?

And then, I tried my wife's iPhone 4, which has not been updated to IOS 5. It has the same exact problem, only that phone never experienced the 'askthecrew' redirect, it simply does the quick redirect to creditpuma and back to where it should be.

I checked my own phone, thinking, well maybe my internet is goofy. Yes, I know, this makes no sense, but I had to try and my iPhone 4 (IOS 5) and it works exactly as it should. No virus. No redirect. No issues at all. (I don't use Safari on my Mac, but Chrome worked fine, as did IE on my Laptop)

Here is the big fat scary - on the iPhone the address bar can often disappear before you even see where you are going. This virus could be on a lot of phones and nobody would notice it even if they were technically inclined . I went out of my way to look for it, and found it. Even if you can see the address bar (like on the iPad) it can happen so fast you don't even think about it - or assume it's just the website itself redirecting you to another page.

Further - I don't think this happened via an App. I use the iPad a few times a week and this virus was not there a week ago, and no common apps have been downloaded (or updated) between the iPad and iPhone.

The people at the Apple store can't help, the best advice I could find on the Internet was to remove the .ipsw file, and I'm not about to pay Apple $30 for phone support to help them fix a serious security flaw in their own OS, which would likely take them 3 months to fix with their current track record.

Still looking for solutions - and warning everyone - check your IOS devices for a Google Redirect Virus.

Nathaniel Beall
Feb 8, 2012

By barsmart on 8 Feb 2012

Sorry...

I did not mean to post that 3 times... admin, please delete. Thank you.

By barsmart on 8 Feb 2012

What kind of bear?

That will determine my response to your "just outrun me" tactic. Either while you're running as fast as your tightly-tied shoes can carry you, I'm pretending to be dead, or you have already been RoShamBoed squarely in the nuts.

By dubiou on 15 Feb 2012

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